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A few months down the track

Well, it's now August and I am down to 72 kilos. I feel so much better: my feet and knees have stopped hurting and I've just started a weightlifting program at the gym to strengthen up. It's taken a while to get to the 'green zone' but I'm there now and finding I usually consume around 1000 calories a day (healthy ones mainly, apart from the occasional chocolate). I have also stopped drinking alcohol. This is one of the things I've noticed with the band - my addictive drivers (food, alcohol, coffee) are all much reduced. As I've previously had breast cancer, which is my primary motivator for losing weight, stopping drinking can only help (it's another risk factor). I want to get down to business and lose this last 7-8 kilos, so I'm starting to record my food intake again. The fact that I've lost so much weight already, without really trying, highlights how effective the band is. The only side-effect I've had is gas - because it's harder to burp, I find that by the end of the day I can have quite a bit of wind buildup, which can cause pain in my shoulder. I'm going to start having peppermint tea to see if that helps. It's well worth it though, for the payoff.

Healthy Eater

Healthy Eater

 

ms shelly murphy

hi all has anyone heard about NERIUM body contouring cream apparently its an alternative to get rid of saggy skin that's having huge results I had my band  years ago the best thing ive ever done life changing I lost 45 kg in my first year and have managed to maintain it     the only thing is I want to look as good as I feel but am to scared to go tummy tuck or plastic surgery but have heard this cream is amazing and fantastic so just want to know if anyone else has tried it before I dish out my money feed back would be hugely appreciated to save me and give me an option instead of surgery

shelly murphy

shelly murphy

 

And so it begins

Finally the waiting is basically over.  Yes I still have 18 days to go before my surgery but I have started my pre-op phase so I finally feel like I am doing something.  I have also paid the rest of my out of pocket expensive and it seems I over budgeted and I have a spare $500 so I am very happy about that.   As for my Optifast diet I am officially four days in and I finally feel like I am getting into a routine with it all.  Breakfast- Shake Lunch - Bar Dinner- Chicken and vegetable stir-fry (type of thing)  Snack- Shake  It's been hard though, no matter how prepared I thought I was. I did not realised how many habits and patterns I had developed around food. Thankfully catching myself when I attempt to fall back on these habits is getting easier and it is interesting to assess the reasons or causes behind these habits.  I have lost almost 3 kgs so far which I am very happy about but I am worried I am falling into a bit of an obsessive behavior in regards to weighing myself. Already I am weighing myself multiple times a day  and I can't help but wonder if I am like this before the op what will I be like afterwards. I guess that is something I will have to tackle as it comes along.  Next step is the actual operation......so bring it on!!!!  

Mandy

Mandy

 

follow up after Achalasia balloon dilation

Been a while since I have updated in here. Seems diet isn't the only thing i get slack on. LONG WINDED BACK STORY and then some other faffing in there, so bare with me. So as some may know i had many problems with my sleeve, namely it being kinked and everything coming up. Basically it was similar to having a stuck moment with a band but there was no way to push things down as the usual techniques a bandit would use just let to more vomiting. in about April/May this year I had a solid barium contrast which showed that the bottom of my stomach was twisted around etc and so was pushing everything up. This lead to bad reflux(40mg Nexium twice a day and even then I often needed some gaviscon or quickeze to help in between) I have felt faint, though BP is fine, don't even have a postural drop which i suspected. i pretty much have lived off coffee(yes i know that doesn't help reflux but i also have a toddler and was finishing nursing studies). Pretty much two bites in no matter how well chewed and things came up. and it would hurt. Even puree soup and that came up. my surgeon told me he had only had one patient have similar symptoms to me about 8 years ago and that she had scar tissue attach to her liver when healing which caused her kink. she was an original sleever not a redo like me(band to sleeve). i gotta say i'm a tad pissy as I even waited 9 months after my band out to convert to sleeve to give my stomach extra time to heal. Anywho, i had a gastroscopy start of June for my surgeon to check what the issue was causing the kink and see if we can work the best option to fix it. Best case was dilation. Worst case full gastric bypass, and then a few options in between them. So after the gastroscopy the good news was I just needed a dilation. Problem being my surgeon hasn't done this type before so referred me to a colleague of is. This colleague has done this procedure a few times and is familiar with the technique. This dilation process is called Achalasia Balloon Dilation. Basically with the procedure they put the gastroscope down my throat(while i'm asleep obviously) then place another instrument down along side the gastroscope(this instrument is too big to go down the gastroscope). It goes down to the part of my stomach where the kink is. for me mine is caused by the stomach scar tissue being healed on each other, so there is a balloon at the end of this instrument which they slowly blow up to burst open the scar tissue. They leave it blown up for 2 to 3 mins at a time until they have done enough. That is the procedure I had done yesterday. So I woke in recovery just a tad groggy. Apparently I had fentanyl in theatre so I wouldn't be in pain. I managed to have a coffee and it didn't come up my throat. almost cried. This is something which basically since i got my sleeve I struggled with. yes even fluids struggled to go down and not come up. I have had only occasionally small stomach cramps. haven't had to take anything for it. I really hope this procedure has worked. today i have had nibbles of food here and there and even had a salad. yes even salad didn't go down before. prior to surgery the surgeon did advise me this may not be a permanent fix and I may still need to switch to a bypass later. He told me has has a patient who was sleeved and had same symptoms as me and stomach was almost identical to mine. He did the dilation last year and slowly the symptoms have come back and he needs to dilate again. If this ends up being the case he said I'll get to a point where I am sick of it and want the bypass so I no longer suffer. i really don't want a bypass. That will be the 3rd weight loss surgery in an attempt to be "normal" and "healthy". i'm aware the risks increase each time we have surgery and am so worried i will actually die from it. Surgeon did a whole bunch of bloods as well as he thinks i would be deficient in a few things such as thiamin due to not eating but also I have been experiencing what i can only describe as feeling like i caught dementia. have had trouble getting words out, like on the tip of my tongue but can't say them, pins and needles in fingers, extreme exhaustion, forgetful etc. it's worse than mummy brain. Anyways was tested for many many things (8 tubes of blood taken) and i'm deficient in nothing. even my vitamin d is higher than the norm for summer time and I have barely taken my multivitamins because i forget. though this last week i've been good. So no idea what is causing my extreme brain farts but seems pathologically i am healthy as an ox so to speak.  So really at this stage i guess we wait and see how it goes and hope for the best. Although I love the weight loss i've had, emotionally the sleeve has taken a toll on me especially with all the vomiting. never being able to eat just a small amount while out, without needing the loo very quickly after because food is sitting in my throat or in my mouth. i hope now I can eat and get back on track. I'm not far off goal weight. I don't even know what that is but i guess maybe another 10kg and i should be done. Will be nice to maybe workout too if i feel like it. again lazy i am good at but i literally have not had the energy to when not eating so yea. let's hope it works. i don't want the bypass but if i had to vomit every day, after every meal and have discomfort even from drinking I don't know how long i would tolerate that for.  Hopefully this will be the last such surgery i have to have and can get on with my life. Just want to feel normal and get on with things instead of always having my body and my attempt to be normal and healthy get in the way. Onwards and upwards hopefully.   Ness

Ness84

Ness84

 

Measurement of obesity accuracy

Calculating a patient’s waist-to-height ratio is the most accurate and efficient way of identifying whether or not they are at risk of obesity, a new study shows. The research, published in PLOS One, examined the whole-body fat percentage and visceral adipose tissue mass of a group of 81 men and women. The British authors discovered that 36.5% more adults would be classified as obese using whole-body fat data (one in two participants) rather than BMI (around one in seven participants, or 13.5%). To conduct their study, they gathered accurate whole-body and abdominal fat data using a total body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner — a highly accurate way of measuring body composition and fat content. They then calculated five predictors of whole-body fat and visceral adipose tissue that could be easily replicated in a GP’s office, and compared the results with those of the DXA scan to determine which simple predictor of obesity was the most accurate. The five predictors tested were: BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and waist-to-height ratio0.5 (WHtR0.5). Lead researcher Dr Michelle Swainson, senior lecturer in exercise physiology at Leeds Beckett University, says although there are benefits to the conventional BMI method, there is concern that it is a misleading measurement. “This is most definitely the case when people have a 'normal’ BMI but high abdominal fat that is often dismissed,” Dr Swainson says. The results from the study show the best predictor of whole-body fat percentage and visceral adipose tissue in both men and women is WHtR. This simple method of waist circumference divided by height measurement is not a new obesity classification but, despite evidence supporting its use, it is still not routinely measured in clinical settings, the authors note. Cut-points for predicting whole body obesity were 0.53 in men and 0.54 in women. The cut-point for predicting abdominal obesity was 0.59 in both sexes

denzel

denzel

 

Getting Closer

It is all starting to feel real now.  I have just under 12 weeks to go now.....11 weeks and 5 days to be precise but whose counting? lol  After all this waiting it finally starting to feel real and I'm getting rather excited. I'm excited that I will finally have the tools needed to lose weight, I'm excited that I will be healthy for me and my daughter and I'm excited that I will finally feel confident in my own skin again. BUT I'm also nervous and I don't think any amount of researching or preparing is going to help and believe me I tried. I have watched videos, read blogs, researched on the net, asked question, talk to people I know who have had it done, over and over and over again and yet I still feel nervous (I'm assuming this is normal). It isn't so much nerves about the procedure or about afterwards (although there is a little bit) it is mostly just about having a operation, I have never had to have one before and the idea of being put to sleep so someone can operate on me is scary but I know this is for the best and I am committed to it so I am just going to have to be a big girl about it and get over my fear.  As far as progress goes... I saw my dietitian the other week and she is lovely. She really knows her stuff and I felt comfort talking to her, I was worried she would be judgy like dietitians in the past but she was so warm and welcoming.  She has said she wants me to start the optislim 2-3 weeks before the operation but I can do it for longer if I like but the last 2-3 weeks are the most important. I think personally for me I might start do it for 4 weeks so that first week can act like a bit of a trail week to see if I ran into any issues and how best to sort them out (ie- how do I go about making my shakes at work without a blender etc). So with that in mind I start my pre-op diet in just under 8 weeks so now I am waiting to hear from the anesthesiologist and the hospital but all that will happen closer to the operation in the meantime I am just focusing on gaining any more weight and continuing my research and preparation.         

Mandy

Mandy

 

Waiting waiting waiting....

Waiting waiting waiting... oh how I am getting over waiting. Even if I was making even a little progress forward I think I would feel better but currently all I feel like I am doing is gaining weight and it is so frustrating. It doesn't seem to matter what I do. This is especially highlighted by the change of season and the sudden need to pull out last year's winter wardrobe as everything is slightly tighter then last year and this in turn is making me self conscious.  Now I have made the decision to do it I just what to get it done, I'm so tired of waiting.  The surgery is paid for and I'm so eager to be done. I wish I had got PHI earlier but I feel I would have still felt like this regardless of if I had done this earlier or not.  So as it stands now I have 143 days to go! That works out to be almost 5 months, I am trying to focus on things I can do to get ready for the operation but this far out there is not much to be done.  I know this post is kind of negative but I want to compile a record of my feelings  (before and after, good and bad) and the process I go through so I have it to look back on.    If you have made it this far THANK YOU, my whinge is over for now.       

Mandy

Mandy

 

12 days after op - so far so good (really good)

It's been 12 days since the op and I've continued to lose weight and feel good. I have a strange feeling in my stomach area - not unpleasant, but just strange (not a sensation I've had before). It's a sensation that seems to be associated with feeling full. When I eat, I only need a small amount and I'm not hungry between meals. There's something about the process of eating - when the food passes the band - that triggers that sensation and makes me feel full. It must be the nerves at the top of the stomach communicating with my brain. Whatever it is, I'm grateful to it because it's doing its job! As I have not yet had a fill, I don't have much trouble eating anything in particular (it's not like my stomach entrance is very small as there's no saline in the lapband at this point) but I'm not sure I'll even need a fill. I'm finding my appetite so reduced and the need to eat when not hungry is gone. It feels like a miracle! Given that I am a very healthy eater, I have just been able to concentrate on eating very high quality, nutrient-dense foods. I'm very focused on getting enough as protein, fruit and veg - particularly fibre. It seems to be going very well and I can feel myself shrinking and shrinking. I've bought a special dress to wear to a wedding in a month's time and I bought a size 40. I would not have fitted into a size 42 a couple of weeks ago. I"m exercising nearly every day, which I would do normally anyway, but I'm finding it so much easier as I lose weight. I feel lighter and stronger.  The main thing I'm noticing is that I feel clear-headed and full of energy. It's a great feeling.  I'm so glad I did this!

Healthy Eater

Healthy Eater

 

Four days in and feeling good!

I want to record the journey of weight loss but I'm a bit distrustful of my scales! On the day of the surgery I recorded 86.5 kilos (my heaviest weight by far) and now - four days later - I'm down to 79.8kilos. That's impossible as far as I'm concerned, so I suspect that my first reading must have been wrong (new scales). I am a very healthy eater and also do regular, good quality exercise, so I was told that I'd be a great candidate for a Lapband. My issue is simply that I love food and tend to eat more (amount and times per day) than my middle-aged body needs. I also tend to eat too quickly. For all these reasons, a Lapband seemed like a very good option for me. At 50yrs, I know that it is critical for me to get my BMI down to the healthy range (from 31) to prevent chronic disease. This procedure - as far as I'm concerned - is to save and extend my life. The surgery on Saturday was very easy. I went in in the morning, drifted off to sleep and woke with no fuss and little nausea. I've been a bit sore the last few days - Monday in particular was very uncomfortable as the gas used in the laparoscopy worked it's way out of my abdomen - but it's certainly manageable. I feel a bit like I've swallowed a rock and it hurts to hiccup (!) but otherwise it's all ok. My appetite is certainly reduced, but not gone.  I'm prompted to think about food when I see it or smell it, but otherwise I really don't think about it until I am clearly hungry (i.e. have only had 50 cals and it's 3pm!). However, what I find very very interesting is that my craving for both coffee and wine has disappeared along with the food cravings! This tells me that so much of my 'appetite' was driven by the reward systems in my brain and not genuine hunger. I knew that cognitively, but it's very interesting to experience that realisation this way. I'm attaching my 'Before' shots so that I have a record. I really look forward to reaching my goal weight of 62 kilos.

Healthy Eater

Healthy Eater

 

It's My 2nd Surgiversary!

It's my 2nd Surgiversary!     I am 26.8 kg down from when I had my pre-op appts, 34.88 kg down from my all-time heaviest (I have lost a good sized Greyhound  ) From my heaviest my BMI was 35, pre op 31.04, currently 20.2, no measurement of body fat% at my heaviest, pre-op 42.5%, currently24.9%  I have had plastic reconstructive surgery - abdominoplasty, belt lipectomy and brachioplastys.   No regrets!

denzel

denzel

 

The journey of a thousand miles...

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.  I have heard this so many times and every time I am reminded of how true it is. I have lost count of all the things I am going to do, I'm always planning on doing this or that but I never follow through. Which brings me to the point of this blog, I know I have needed bariatric surgery for a while now but I have never done anything about it. Instead I have put my head in the sand and stubbornly kept attempting (and failing) diets and schemes that I know don't work.  Recently I turned 30, and to be honest it scared me a lot. Not because I thought I was getting old or anything but because I felt like I should have my life more organised by now. That list of all those things I was going to do suddenly became very important and I really begun regretting the things I had never done. I decided that come my 40th birthday I didn't want to have these same regrets, so it is time to get working on that list.  But as I looked at that list I realized that my weight is a major factor in being able/having the confident to do the things on my list not to mention the very scary toll it is taking on my health. So if I am going to accomplish my list that first I need tackle my weight and this time I have to do something new because the old methods just aren't working (my weight doesn't go down, I'm on blood pressure medication, my PCOS is out of control, my legs, feet ache terribly by the end of the day etc).   So here I am. I have finally taken that first step. I got my referral to see a bariatric specialist (9th Dec) and this coming Friday I am visiting my GP to see if I can go on the public list, as I have over 8 months before my insurance kicks in and now that I have finally come to my senses I would to get moving on this as soon as possible.  If you have made it this far thank you for reading my rambling lol.   

Mandy

Mandy

 

6 Days PostOp

Everything is going along fine, I am increasing my free fluid intake slowly and am nearly up to a cup!! Yet still amazingly, I am not feeling hungry, this is too good to be true, never have I ever....  Onto some reality though, I am experiencing the horrible neck shoulder pain, thought I was a hero last night with no pain relief, how wrong I was. in my defence, I wasn't feeling pain before bed, just uncomfortable, this to me didn't warrant an endone! well I was reaching for one this morning I can tell you, along with a maxalon for how sick I felt. The moral to my story is - don't be a hero, take all the steps necessary to have a comfortable and safe recovery Annette

Annettemariebee

Annettemariebee

 

Week Four

Well have lost 17kg in the two weeks post op and pre op to date. Have experienced hunger for the first time but found a glass of water usually fixes that. First big challenge this week as I hit the road for a work project. Packing shakes and some mushy food so I don't get caught out at this stage I don't think a pub feed will cut it. I feel great. Only had one reflux episode since the operation and that was my fault eating too fast....SLOOOOOOW is the Go. Getting great back up service from my surgeons post op nurse . available every day by phone and great to check Im doing the right thing. So challenge of travel this week but Im up to it.

Collobj

Collobj

 

3 Days Post Op

it really becomes a personal journey! Before I went home yesterday, I had nausea which resulted in vomiting, I probably took the panadol too quick or something, I can tell you it is an experience I do not want to repeat because of the pain.  I feel reasonably comfortable with my pain relief and being very anal about my fluids, especially because it is hot here in the tropics and dehydration is a reality even without banding. i am amazed that I don't feel hungry, who would've thought that food is thought of so differently for me and so soon into the journey!  Annette

Annettemariebee

Annettemariebee

 

PreOp Waiting

As I sit here and think of what I can and can't eat, I imagine my life as a healthier being. My stomach isn't rumbling but my brain is saying 'I could eat'!  Easier day by day? Sometimes! I just have to remind myself of the better times ahead.  My concern is mostly about the first few weeks after the banding (2/11) if I'm hungry now, what's that going to be like? Am I going to fail?  I really hope not. so for now I will imagine

Annettemariebee

Annettemariebee

 

Pre/Post Op6 y

Pre Op The day finally arrived to start my pre op "diet". This is required to soften my liver so they can access my stomach. Ended up starting the next day (probably why I was given 2 1/2 weeks and not 2). I did surprisingly well. The first 3 days were complete torture. My dietician and surgeon allowed me to have non carb snacks such as carrots, broccoli and even diet jelly. By the end of the 2 1/2 weeks I was pretty happy with a couple of shakes. I was 99kg to start. By the time I arrived at the hospital I weighed in at 92.5 kgs. My goal weight is 72kg. Not bad 20% down prior to banding. On the way to the hospital I desperately wanted to pull in to the fish and chip shop or maccas or anywhere and get some food. No solids for the next 4 - 6 weeks. I would surely die - or be a mere shadow of my former self. But that's the point. If I don't do this I will die sooner than expected. A plethora of health issues weight related, not to mention self esteem. And a history of heart disease. I need to do this. There was a bit of a wait at the hospital, sitting around in a gown with no undies on and some crazy compression stockings. Finally, it was time to kiss hubby goodbye. As I headed to the operating room I couldn't help but cry. I had done this to myself, my body. I had made all the bad choices that had got me here. I couldn't control my eating. I needed to do this for me, my son, my husband, my life. Next thing I knew was I was out cold....   Post Op This is not glamorous... Not at all. I woke up screaming down the recovery room. The pain through my body was unbearable (and I've had a baby). The nurses were quick to give me 1, then a second, then a third dose of pain killers. I calmed. My body was shaking and trembling from the gas. I think I may have fallen in and out of a drug consciousness.  I was wheeled to my room and heard the sound of my husband and son. They were talking in the hallway and I came past unexpectedly. I started to cry again. I wanted the mask off not to frighten my son. I could barely stay awake to say hello.  I was out again.   The First night. The first not was sleepless. I had a lady in the same ward as me who was a little inconsiderate talking on her phone and television blaring. The nurses gave me earplugs. Every time I dosed off the nurse would need to take my BP and for some reason needed to wake me to do so. I had IV fluids and had to go to the bathroom every hour.  I had many pain killers.   The next day at 10am they sent me home.  You think that after 100s of surgeries the chemist would know to order all mess in a liquid form... That's another story.   Home So home 4 days. Mostly sleeping. The first couple of days hardly any liquids. Just those for crushed meds.  Am starting to have a broth a day and a juice. Still have not gone to the loo, though I am on benefiber. I will feel better once that is all back to normal. Still pain in tummy. Lots of gas.  Mucous cough has subsided so a lot more comfortable. Weight down to 90.4 - less than 20kg to go. Can only stay awake for max 2 - 3hrs. Body just needs to heal.  Pretty sore from lying down.   Looking forward to being able to stand up straight and spend time with my son.      

Sarband

Sarband

 

Exciting & Liberating

How thrilled was I to cull my wardrobe yesterday & take lots and lots of clothes to charity.    There's plenty of room for new, smaller, items in the future (not yet I have another 17kg to go yet!)  Absolutely thrilled that I made the decision to do this.  It has changed my life  

Nickimat

Nickimat

 

WHAT CAN WE REALLY LEARN 40 YEARS ON FROM THE MINNESOTA CORONARY EXPERIMENT?

"WHAT CAN WE REALLY LEARN 40 YEARS ON FROM THE MINNESOTA CORONARY EXPERIMENT?"   "What a massive week in nutrition science! It was revealed that part of the results from the biggest study ever done to test the diet-heart hypothesis were hidden away and never published. Until now, published in the BMJ by a sort of data archaeologist Christopher Ramsden from the National Institute of Health.   The diet-heart hypothesis says that saturated fat raises cholesterol and thus causes heart disease.   This might not seem like an important question to you, but widespread acceptance of this idea has shaped the way we look and how we eat more than anything else in the history of health and medicine.   It’s still the cornerstone of conventional wisdom and dietary guidelines in virtually every country. It’s still the reason the conventional experts can’t take the biologically obvious leap to embracing low carb healthy fat diets for important treatments like weight loss and diabetes.   So, 40+ years on. Here it is in all its glory, published in the BMJ no less. What did they find?   “Available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows that replacement of saturated fat in the diet with linoleic acid effectively lowers serum cholesterol but does not support the hypothesis that this translates to a lower risk of death from coronary heart disease or all causes. Findings from the Minnesota Coronary Experiment add to growing evidence that incomplete publication has contributed to overestimation of the benefits of replacing saturated fat with vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid.”   That’s right, there was no support for their hypothesis in a randomised trial of more than 9500. Replacing saturated fat with Omega 6 fat did reduce cholesterol, but as we’d predict had no effect on heart disease. The one effect they did see was that older subjects who lowered their cholesterol had higher overall mortality.   Yes, cholesterol lowering in older adults caused more death. This is an effect already seen in some population studies.   So what should we take from all this?   It’s hard to say.   It’s hard because we will never know the exact motivations of Ancel Keys the co-principal investigator and infamous diet-heart hypothesis. The guy who shouted down sugar and had the world believe it was butter that was killing us via clogged arteries. If we knew why he decided not to publish these results, and why he waited 16 years to publish the only report on this experiment that did come out during his lifetime, it would be interesting.     If it turned out that the data just didn’t suit his view of the world, then that would be bordering on scientific fraud.   If he just got too busy because of his career success, and ran out of time in the end. Well…is that even plausible for the biggest diet experiment ever conducted? Its hard to imagine Keys being short of resources to help publish a study this important, especially for the time it was published.   How should it change our minds? Well, that depends on who you are really. I’ve never seen the evidence that says that eating saturated fat, in the context of whole food causes harm including more death or even heart disease. The “saturated fat raises LDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol is associated with more heart disease in some groups” argument isn’t a cause and effect argument. It’s just a hypothesis.   So I’m perfectly happy to look at this for what it is. Ancel Keys probably behaved unethically, the full extent of which is hard to say. There was never any evidence to demonise saturated fat to the extent that it should become public health enemy number one.   Will convention change?   There is now mounting evidence to advise people to eat less sugar and starch, especially if you are insulin resistant. This is creeping into policy.   But the status quo around fat? Why won’t this change, even with these new (but old) studies being revealed. Even with the evidence of publication bias like this? I think we all see the word through our own dissonance.   Conventional experts will find problems with Key’s study. I’ve already seen many of these in the rapid response section of the BMJ (we have one there too). Such things as trial length, lack of knowing what they actually ate, low numbers in the autopsy results and so on. These are all issues to be sure, but not such that they’d somehow magically change the outcome to suit the diet-heart hypothesis. All of the diet-heart trials suffer from some of these issues, and usually from others as well (like telling the subjects cutting saturated fat to eat less refined food and more whole food, which at least didn’t happen here, making it a purer test of the hypothesis)   I’d add an issue – they replaced saturated fat with corn oil in high doses (about 19% of calories). Does anyone in modern nutrition science think this is a good idea? Yet they had to do this to lower cholesterol enough to make a difference, in terms of the diet-heart hypothesis.   Predictably, the experts have told us there is no reason to change current dietary advice which is low fat, and saturated fat is to be substituted by polyunsaturated fat. Why? They cite the results of the meta-analyses of prospective cohorts (following large numbers of people living freely in the population with no actual experiment done). We agree that adding some essential polyunsaturated fats may be a good idea up to the point you get what you need (probably well under 10% of energy). But these studies don’t show that replacing saturated fat is the cause of any benefit, because you see the same small equal benefit of substituting in polyunsaturated fat for carbs.   These cohort studies give us the hypothesis that adding polyunsaturated fats in smallish amounts regardless of what they substitute might have some benefit. The experiments need to be done to find this out for certain.   They cite the Hooper Cochrane review of all the actual diet experiments where saturated fat lowering was part of the diet intervention. In this review there is no effect of these interventions on anything much at all, except one small effect of the interventions on combined coronary events.   Digging Deep OK, so digging deeper what is this effect? This small effect and how it was worked out is critical for the perpetuation of the modern diet-heart hypothesis and mainstream nutrition rejecting low carb eating.   You’ll be surprised about this little effect. When all experiments are added together we see that for the “Reduce saturated fat (treatment)” there were 21 791 people, of which 1774 (or 8.14%) had some sort of cardiovascular event over the study period (52 months). In the “usual diet (control)” there were 31509 people, or which 2603 (or 8.26%) had some sort of cardiovascular event over the same period.   To more directly compare what might happen here we can extrapolate. If we extrapolated and pretend we randomised 20 000 people – 10 000 to a reduced fat diet and 10 000 people their usual diet then we would expect to see 826 CVD events for the usual diet and a reduction to 814 for the reduced saturated fat. That’s a difference in 12 CVD events in 10 000 people over just about 4.5 years, because of eating less saturated fat (compared to doing nothing). And these 12 CVD events that make up the difference do not include either heart attacks or deaths; they include events like angina instead. That’s a change in absolute risk of 0.12%.   Underwhelmed? Hell yes. So am I, especially because the trials that did show some positive effect like the Oslo diet heart study weren’t just about substituting out saturated fat. They were about more exercise, more vegetables, less processed food, eating fewer calories and often more. In fact, the statistical adjustment the authors make means that these smaller, multifaceted studies end up being given extra weighting because of the chance the bigger studies overwhelm the results. In the end, it’s hard to see a path, other than a new generation coming through, for the diet-heart hypothesis to go away. It’s hard to see conventional wisdom changing anytime soon.   Remember – in all these studies, there has never been a diet-heart trial of replacing carbohydrate with polyunsaturated and/or monounsaturated fat. There hasn’t even been one that was a test of reducing sugar. All the government funding for long term trials to test the effect of diet on heart health over the years has gone to one team with one idea – to try to lower cholesterol by replacing saturated fat in the diet and see what happens.   Butter or corn oil? I said before that we all end up with our own dissonance. I’m not naïve enough to think I am excluded from this. I obviously have a bias for low carb healthy fat eating and may see the world that way. That’s why it’s critical for you to take a little time to see the world of nutrition science for what it is and make up your own mind."   http://whatthefatbook.com/prof-grant-on-minnesota-coronary-experiment/  

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"A FAT LOAD OF GOOD: WHY IT'S TIME TO BRING FULL FAT BACK" The Age, April 13 2016

A FAT LOAD OF GOOD: WHY IT'S TIME TO BRING FULL FAT BACK The Age. April 13, 2016   Start your day with toast, hold the butter but add margarine if you like. Have it with an egg-white omelette because the yolk is bad and a strong coffee with a splash of fat-free milk and maybe a calorie-free sweetener. Splenda perhaps – apparently, according to Splenda, "people with diabetes can enjoy up to 4 packets of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener or up to 8 teaspoons of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated, because it is considered a 'free food'." Ten or 15 years ago, this messed-up meal might have been considered a healthy breakfast.   In recent years however, we have learnt that fat is nothing to be afraid of; fat, unlike the message sounded out since the 1950s, does not make us fat. Fake food like margarine and calorie-free sweeteners on the other hand ... well, that's another story.   Another food myth that has been busted is that full-fat dairy and other animal fats – including bacon and egg yolks – lead to heart disease. In fact, new research has found that those who consume full-fat dairy tend to weigh less and have a reduced risk of diabetes.   Research published in the American Journal of Nutrition analysed the data of 18,438 women in the Women's Health Study, and found that those who consumed the most high-fat dairy products were about 10 per cent less likely to be overweight.   A separate meta-analysis of more than 3000 people over 15 years found that consumers of full-fat dairy had a 46 per cent lower risk of diabetes. "There is no prospective human evidence that people who eat low-fat dairy do better than people who eat whole-fat dairy," lead researcher Dr Darian Mozaffarian, of Tufts University, told Time.   It makes sense that the fat from full-fat dairy is more satiating, so people are less likely to overeat and the fat is not being swapped for sugar or carbohydrates, but why the association with diabetes?   "They did find that saturated fatty acids in dairy are strongly associated with reducing risk (of diabetes)," explains cardiologist and adviser to the UK's National Obesity Forum, Dr Aseem Malhotra, who was not involved in the study. "When you remove fat you remove the fatty acids."   In a separate paper tellingly titled Evidence from randomised controlled trials did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983, researchers concluded that recommendations to reduce fat intake to lessen the risk of heart disease were misguided.   "The present review concludes that dietary advice not merely needs review; it should not have been introduced," concluded the researchers from the University of West Scotland.   It is an issue close to Malhotra's heart.   "The science is quite clear," says Malhotra. "There are two major factors why the low-fat message is perpetuating itself – that fat will increase the risk of heart disease and that fat makes you fat. "The latest data on saturated fat – over several decades – has revealed that it doesn't increase heart disease and, if it comes from dairy, it is protective against diabetes and heart disease." He adds fat has the lowest impact on insulin resistance and says that insulin resistance is the greater risk factor in cardiovascular disease. "Good fats – extra virgin olive oil, nuts, butter, coconut oil – are anti-inflammatory and reduce the risk of a heart attack," Malhotra says.   So why is it that the Australian Dietary Guidelines and many doctors and dietitians still advise consuming reduced fat dairy?   "We're unwilling to admit that we were wrong, but science evolves," Malhotra says. "I started off giving that advice [low-fat]. For me, knowing what I know, it would be unethical to give that advice now. "There is an urgent need to overhaul the dietary guidelines – the guidelines lag behind the science." As they stand, he says they're a "direct cause" of the obesity epidemic. Dr Joanna McMillan says we "have to be careful" not to attack the guidelines with every new study.   "Is the dairy making the difference or is it what they're eating instead?" she asks. "What about if you have a diet with plenty of fat from extra virgin olive oil, nuts, seeds, oily fish, avocado and so on, but choose to have skim milk to reduce the kilojoules from your several coffees? Or just because you like it (as I do!)?"   There is also the fact that not all fat is equal of course. "At the end of the day saturated fat from a piece of cheese is not the same as saturated fat from a party pie," McMillan says, adding: "The message overall is to stop buying low fat when it is replaced by refined carbs (not just sugar) – in fact eat more real food that is not manipulated by manufacturing to meet some nutrient criteria."   Indeed Yale's Dr David Katz has argued that the low-fat advice, based largely on the controversial findings from a 1950s study by scientist Ancel Keys and echoed by Preventive Medicine Research Institute founder Dr Dean Ornish, has been warped by the food industry.   "When [Ancel Keys] advised that we should eat less fat, the advice meant eat more spinach," Katz tells Jeff Wilser in his new book The Good News About What's Bad For You. "The food industry said, we can't make a lot of money selling spinach, but we can invent Snackwell Low-Fat Cookies." "I wouldn't disagree with that," says Malhotra, who eats up to 15 eggs a week and has bacon a couple of times a week. "If you're avoiding fat and eating more vegetables, there's not a problem with that."   His problem is whether fat is being replaced by sugar or refined carbohydrates, and that people still fear fat. McMillan agrees this needs to change. "I think we will see a revisal of the dairy guidelines in future Australian Dietary Guidelines and that would be a welcome move," she says. "Eating fat is as likely to make you fat as eating greens is to make you green," Malhotra says. "It's time to bring fat back."   How much fat is OK? "Force yourself to eat anything in excess and you will probably do harm," Malhotra says. "Eat until you're full. Try to avoid snacking and eat real food."   Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/a-fat-load-of-good-why-its-time-to-bring-full-fat-back-20160412-go4gyc.html#ixzz46Ew9HfiK Follow us: @theage on Twitter | theageAustralia on Facebook   http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/a-fat-load-of-good-why-its-time-to-bring-full-fat-back-20160412-go4gyc.html#ixzz462e0ZucK

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New update

So I have some time to sit and write an update on how everything is going. I'm finally under 90kg but only just 89.4kg. So I'm almost at 88kg the last weight I rember being as a teenager. So now I'm almost there I need to set a new target I'm just going to keep it easy and say 80kg. I haven't been working out as much as I should well I haven't done anything at all if I'm honest. I have been working extra hours almost an extra 10hr each week on top of my normal work week so been very tired and just can't be bothered, need a good kick up the bum to get out and do it!  As for eating, been a bit shit lately not eating as much protein as I should and sometimes skipping a meal. I guess I'm so use to fast food that having to cook just takes to much time and energy. I want food and I want it now and I don't want to have to cook. But then on the other side I could never eat fast food again as just looking at it makes me feel sick so does seeing such huge portions, like really I use to eat that much?! How I ever fit in so much food I don't know! I really want to make fresh, beautiful, healthy food but don't really know how. When ever I try it doesn't work. Some how I always manage to over salt or spice stuff, can fix it by not adding salt till its done. Then I buy all this fresh food and not end up cooking it and it gos to the dog not that shes complaining lol. There are thing I would buy and cook but I know I would be the only one eating it and I'm not going to eat much so there seems to be no point in buying it! Its very frustrating to find things to make  the hole family will eat.  So my food in a day gos a bit like this Breakfast- Coffee then half an hour latter: fruit smoothy or bake beans on toast or just the toast depends on time. Morning tea- coffee Lunch- 2 cruskets with peanut butter and oats sprinkled on top or a bit of chicken or nothing sometimes I'm so busy at work I don't stop for lunch. Afternoon tea- decaf coffee Tea- meat of some kind with rice or cous cous, or meat and veg if I can be botherd or what ever I can find in the fridge. Then I end the day with another decaf coffee. Yes I drink a lot of coffee but I don't drink cold drinks. This is a normal work day, if I'm at home there is more coffee and tea is a lot better coz I have had time to make something. I wish I had a person chef!! Lol don't we all? Crap lost my train of thought. Well I want to post some pics of before all this started and some of me now but my computer is being upgraded so can't just yet. I haven't even seen before and after photos I have them of me in my bra and nickers I will be embarrassed when I do post them but I think I need too to make it seem real coz at the moment I see the different in my clothes and what other ppl say but when I'm naked by myself in the shower I look the same and feel the same, I know the scales say I have lost 41kg but I just don't see it when I look at my body. This is why I need to see the photos and put them next to each other so I CAN see it! But part of me won't be convenience till I don't have such a rolly fat tummy the part I hate the most. I know I shouldn't say thos things about myself and be more positive but its hard to do that all the time. On another note, got a letter to remind me I'm due for a pap smear! So if its been 2 years since your last pap smear plz go and get one! And have your breast exam at the same time.  Well that's it for now as miss 2 has decided to jump all over me.

Juggalette_Naomi

Juggalette_Naomi

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