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I'm worried we could be setting ourselves up for OTHER problems?

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Hi everyone,

I wonder if anyone else has had similar thoughts but...

I am scared that because we are all concentrating on what we eat, and its timing and how much we eat etc that we could be setting our selves up for eating problems?

I don't know if its just because I'm a new bandit or if people who have been banded for much longer still have this thought but this I guess is how it all starts?

Our surgeons give us a goal weight, and we have our own personal goal weight which often seems to be about 5kg's lower...

Has anyone else thought about this?

Jen xx

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I really don't know. After all, a lot of us may be in this position because of prior eating disorders (overeating etc) - I know I am (compulsive overeating and bulimia). And I do know a lady who was banded and is now basically anorexic - completely obsessed with food (cooking heaps and forcing others to eat it) and her body (pinching her skin and going, "Look at that! It's fat!".

 

It's interesting, though. My surgeon hasn't given me a goal weight. My personal goal is still higher than my body weight "should" be, but I guess I figure that any weight lost is a bonus and puts me in a better position than I was when I started. :)

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I think that setting your own (revisable) goal weight is natural - I mean, it is a process, losing weight, and there has to be somewhere you 'settle' at. 

 

But everyone is different (how much exercise they take, height, metabolism, genetics, ability to control portions and cravings) and I think surgeons know that not everyone will reach a goal weight, - their own, or the surgeon's expectation.  

 

I think surgeons are more realistic and set the goal higher so more people achieve a goal that at least takes them into a healthier life.  I mean, all our lives we have been battling weight gain and feeling like losers, so they would not want us to lose 60-80% of the weight that is stopping us living healthy lives and still feel like we have lost another battle, would they?

 

We are bandits because we have not had a good relationship with food and exercise in the past, and will be working on that for the rest of our lives too.  Slim people keep track of what they weigh, but in a more relaxed way.  They also quietly watch what they eat and when, and slot exercise into their daily lives.  They just do it more subconsiously.  If their waistband feels a bit tighter they just eat a little less and a bit healthier over the next few days.  If they go out for dinner and decide to have dessert they do eat it, but they might hit the gym the next morning and do a good cardio session. 

 

I want to get to that place where it all happens subconsciously, but I know I will always have to be careful of my choices too.  Some people have allergies, asthma, epilepsy, arthritis, depression, etc etc, and learn to live with those things day to day, to just get on with it and still have the best life they can.  I see myself in a similar place, but with eating choices as my disorder.

 

To me, the relationship I have with food is always going to require self-monitoring, but (with my band as a helper) what I eat and how I exercise will hopefully just become a way of life, not an obsession.  I have changed so much (head and habits)  in just a few months already I really do think that it is feasible to change my lifestyle in that way.

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Jen i have considered that myself actually. Before i just used to enjoy food, wasnt happy with my body but didnt really care enough to change.

Now i am obsessed with food, counting calories, worry if i eat a tiny chocolate will i see it on the scale the next day, which I know are symptoms of anorexia because my best friend has it. I feel incredible guilt if i eat something unhealthy and consider punishing myself with exercise, I constantly talk about my food and weight with my partner.

I guess this is why psychologists are recommended when you start the journey..

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Hi everyone,

I wonder if anyone else has had similar thoughts but...

I am scared that because we are all concentrating on what we eat, and its timing and how much we eat etc that we could be setting our selves up for eating problems?

I don't know if its just because I'm a new bandit or if people who have been banded for much longer still have this thought but this I guess is how it all starts?

Our surgeons give us a goal weight, and we have our own personal goal weight which often seems to be about 5kg's lower...

Has anyone else thought about this?

Jen xx

Hi Jen

 

What I have learnt on this journey is slow and steady is the way. There will always be the extreme element you know the kind of all or nothing attitude.  Please don't count the freckles on a chockie :huh:

 

I eat well but do have high protein.  I allow myself free days which is good to keep the metabolism moving.  It has been proven if

you totally deprive you will eventually want revenge :ph34r:

 

I have set myself a reasonable goal certainly not the book weight for height.

 

Keep up the great work

Hugs

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I often think this as well. Having a band sometimes feels like a different type of 'disordered' eating. I don't mean to offend anyone, I'm sorry if I do.

I try very hard to lose concentrate on fueling my body rather than losing weight quickly, but it is difficult once the numbers start dropping consistently.

 

Personally, my goal weight is 5kg heavier than my surgeon's goal though

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Thanks for the input everyone.

Short poppy makes a great point in the fact that yes everyone is different.

I come from a different background of being incredibly active and never really having to worry about food. But since my life changed and I became sedentary, that's when I piled on the weight as I was not able to exercise or use any energy that the food gave me therefore I stored it. I developed respiratory problems during the time I have been sedentary - possibly and most likely related to the number of operations I had due to my injury that caused my sedentary lifestyle. Because of this severe respiratory problems and added weight gain of an excess of 25kg? - that I was banded.

I was certainly no saint during the last 6 years but I defiantly know I'm not a comfort eater (I hide when things go wrong) and so, and I'm finding the focus on portion control, calories, and nutrients etc really difficult. I unfortunately know that i am that all or nothing type of person too, like I don't do things by half. I'm thinking 6-12months down the line where will will I be?

Already I've lost all interest in food. I don't know if this is because my weight loss has stalled, or I'm sick of thinking about food. But I can't make any decisions on what to eat, nor can I be bothered with eating.

Jen xx

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Personally, I had eating problems long before being banded and I know that I will have to manage my eating issues for the rest of my life. Naturally thin people generally don't eat unless they are hungry. Unfortunately, this is not a concept that comes naturally to me. Therefore, I will always have to consciously monitor what and when I eat, check in with myself on whether I am physically hungry before deciding whether to eat and avoid trigger foods that set off uncontrollable bingeing.

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Because I'm not 'hungry' all the time I think about food much less.  I got home from work tonight and realised I hadn't eaten anything today and I didn't miss it.  Because I'm not thinking about food all the time I'm far less obsessed by it.

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its not unknown for bandits and sleevers to turn to alcohol as a "comfort" substitute for food

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I do moderate to high intensity cardio 5 or 6 times a week. Even over the Xmas period, I only took off Xmas day (no gyms open) and New Year's day (Bondi gym would have been too packed). I had a knee injury late Nov from starting to do too many high impact classes (eg Body Attack, Step) since my primary cardio is cycle classes (eg RPM). I was not happy about stopping cardio for 1.5 weeks to wait for my knee to feel better. I was extremely anxious that I would never return to my regular fitness schedule which I have kept for 3+ years and that my weight would increase. However, I actually lost weight during that period because I'm currently very focused on having a good diet. 

 

Every thing I do is either all or nothing. In the past I've pushed myself to do multiple cycle classes a day for months at a time. If the fatties on Biggest Loser can do all that exercise then I can to. But, I now realise that type of attitude is not sustainable and probably not very healthy in the long-term. 

 

So yes, I would say I'm addicted to exercise. I'm sure I'm not the only Bandit here that obsessives this way.

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Sorry I cant find where to start a new topic but I went to my local d for a approval to go the gym to walk on the treadmill and I have lost 10 kgs since I started this adventure about 4 weeks ago !!!!! very happy  :rolleyes:

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Sorry I cant find where to start a new topic but I went to my local d for a approval to go the gym to walk on the treadmill and I have lost 10 kgs since I started this adventure about 4 weeks ago !!!!! very happy  :rolleyes:

Great work ospanienpaws! When you go from the main page into FAQ, Introductions, bandit lounge etc the start new topic button is just here -> see photo for future reference.

post-7921-0-57751800-1357190233_thumb.jp

But great work in 4 weeks! :D

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While I've only had one stuck/blockage moment I've had 2 other occasions where I have just brought up saliva after I've eaten. One was from a time when I think I may have been full, but don't know what full feels like yet, and then tonight I had the most frustrating tiniest bit of peach skin stuck. As I was just bring up the saliva (and eventually the peach skin) in a few PB's (but its more like esophagus spasms) over about 20 mins I said to my mum... "I feel like I'm bulimic! Eating then regurgitating!". Obviously this is not the case and just an unfortunate stuck moment but for those who get stuck moments regularly.. How do you feel?

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It's always possible but my first reaction to the question is that we all seem to be 'hard wired/set' to eat too much, rather than the other way around. From the little knowledge I have of anorexia and bulimia, these start between adolescence and early adult hood so if it hasn't been an issue in the past its not likely to pop up as a new one.

 

I know I obsess about calories, grams of this and that, volumes etc but it dooesnt seem to alter what I put in my mouth unless my head is in the right place.  If I knew how to reset that I wouldn't be such a chubber now.

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I do understand where you are coming from and this may happen with some.  While I am currently obsessed with eating "right", counting calories/portion sizes etc, I would rather be doing this than obsessing over food and convincing myself I can have this and I'll be ok and I can eat that block of chocolate and the world won't end and my partner just upset me so I'll just sit down and eat a whole bag of crisps.

 

To me, I view it as setting myself up to be able to cope in the future by knowing what is good for me, what works for me, and developing better eating habits to lose or maintain weight once at goal to lead a happy, healthy life particularly when/if, for whatever reason, I have the band out.

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Hmm it's interesting. We have all become bandits or slevers because we have/had become/became overweight, but the way we have got there DOES vary. I know for me, I piled on weight because I was sedentary due to an a horrible injury sustained while x-country skiing. Prior to this injury there was nothing I loved more than being outdoors and camping, hiking, canoeing and skiing etc, and I was at the gym 2 a week and very fit. I'm not an emotional eater and not a snacker. I was also banded as I have several health issues, one of which being a severe respiratory problem that means my airways need to be surgically opened on a tri-monthly basis.

Just finding myself a bit lost...

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Hmm it's interesting. We have all become bandits or slevers because we have/had become/became overweight, but the way we have got there DOES vary. I know for me, I piled on weight because I was sedentary due to an a horrible injury sustained while x-country skiing. Prior to this injury there was nothing I loved more than being outdoors and camping, hiking, canoeing and skiing etc, and I was at the gym 2 a week and very fit. I'm not an emotional eater and not a snacker. I was also banded as I have several health issues, one of which being a severe respiratory problem that means my airways need to be surgically opened on a tri-monthly basis.

Just finding myself a bit lost...

Some people will find this easy and some hard, love. Just know you're doing great!

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Some people will find this easy and some hard, love. Just know you're doing great!

Thanks sweetie xx

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I have had an eating disorder from a very young age and have only been thin for a very short period of time in my life. When I was thin I weighed myself 6 times a day and became obssesed with exercising.

I still weigh myself everyday and I constantly think about food and if I am being good or bad with food.

I am hoping when i get the band it will help me stop thinking of food constantly as I won't be feeling hungry. In saying that I can't remember feeling hungry for a very long time now.

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I have had an eating disorder from a very young age and have only been thin for a very short period of time in my life. When I was thin I weighed myself 6 times a day and became obssesed with exercising.

I still weigh myself everyday and I constantly think about food and if I am being good or bad with food.

I am hoping when i get the band it will help me stop thinking of food constantly as I won't be feeling hungry. In saying that I can't remember feeling hungry for a very long time now.

 

 

Getting the lapband has made me much more obsessed with food, calories and weighing than I ever was prior. Some days I wonder If I will ever have normal feeling towards food. I both love and hate it and I literally THINK about food all day. in my head I am always planning my next meal, or thinking up a new recipe to try out, what i have eaten so far that day and if i can get away with a treat, or if i need to have lettuce for my next meal.

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I have had an eating disorder from a very young age and have only been thin for a very short period of time in my life. When I was thin I weighed myself 6 times a day and became obssesed with exercising.

I still weigh myself everyday and I constantly think about food and if I am being good or bad with food.

I am hoping when i get the band it will help me stop thinking of food constantly as I won't be feeling hungry. In saying that I can't remember feeling hungry for a very long time now.

Unfortunately the band wont change how your brain works. I seem to always want to eat and it has nothing to do with physical hunger. In fact, I have to think hard for a minute or so to even work out if I'm hungry every time my brain tells me to eat something. I have a rule that I have to consciously enforce (which takes effort on my behalf). Before I eat anything I ask myself if I am actually hungry and if I'm not then I shouldn't be eating. For some reason this thought process does not occur naturally for me.

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Getting the lapband has made me much more obsessed with food, calories and weighing than I ever was prior. Some days I wonder If I will ever have normal feeling towards food. I both love and hate it and I literally THINK about food all day. in my head I am always planning my next meal, or thinking up a new recipe to try out, what i have eaten so far that day and if i can get away with a treat, or if i need to have lettuce for my next meal.

Same...But I've never been normal when it comes to eating. That's how I ended up double my size in the first place. So I think it's unrealistic to expect that all of these brain/obsessive problems will ever go away for good. I just have to find ways to cope with them in the same way that an alcoholic or drug addict does when they are in recovery.

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I'm the same as Missy in regards to wanting to eat and it not having anything to do with being actually hungry. 

 

Over the years I was also obsessed with food, diets, calories, exercise etc, being fat.  First thing I thought of when I woke up and last thing I thought about on going to sleep and the many hundreds of minutes of thinking about it in between. 

 

About 6 years ago I took part in a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) study through a university psychology department.  I saw it advertised in the local paper.  They were looking for women that had body image issues.  After an initial interview, I was accepted along with 4 or 5 other women and I think the study lasted about 12 weeks.   I can say without a doubt that this was very successful for me in getting rid of food/exercise ruling my life.  In fact it may have gone slightly the other way because I put on a little bit of weight!  But apparently this can happen (rare).  For the others, some stayed the same weight and a couple lost a huge amount of weight (we kept in touch for a couple of years).

 

It has been such a great burden off my shoulders.  It doesn't mean I don't care about being fat, eating the wrong food, exercise etc (being banded last year shows that but for me now, it's more about my health), but I'm not obsessed about it anymore.  I'm much more relaxed, I got rid of all my 'rules' regarding food and exercise and it opened my eyes to how WOMEN'S MINDS truly are imprisoned by weight/food/exercise/body image.

 

At the interview, I had to open up and tell the psychologist things I'd never told anyone or even admitted to myself.  The tears fell.  I'm usually not that kind of person.  I tend to keep it all inside and not get emotional about such things.  Psychologist told me that every woman she had so far interviewed had cried.  It was quite shocking to be asked pointed question about something that I thought no one else would know about or understand.

 

The group sessions were great.  I was not keen to start with, on sharing this with a bunch of other women.  I was hoping we would do one on one but as the sessions started, it was obvious that it was the best way to do it.  I learnt so much about other women and how my issues were not unique.  On the other hand, I thanked my lucky stars that I did not have some of the issues that the others had.

 

We had workbooks to work on to introduce the next topic in between the sessions and then we would focus on that topic for the next week or two.

 

So, if anyone gets a similar opportunity, I would highly recommend it.

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