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I have been thinking about getting lap band surgery done for some time now and have just started reading into.  I have seen a few forums where they are saying they had to be under a certain BMI before allowing the procedure to take place.  Can anyone shed some light on this ?

 

And also where to go to start.....I am from Brisbane North. Is there clinics to go to, to get advice ?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Shelle

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Where I went, they didn't mention a specific BMI, but they did say they wanted me to get as close to 140kg (I was 160 at the time) as I could. I got to 145 before surgery, and I had no complications whatsoever.

Also, I started by going to my GP, who referred me to a surgeon. From there, I had an initial consultation with was basically an information session, mo obligations.

All the best :-)

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In the UK I think they can only get free WLS if they are under a BMI 50. Can't remember what their equivalent to medicare is.

 

Other than that, the only time I've heard this is when people are very very high BMIs and it is deemed too unsafe to operate until their BMI comes down.

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In the UK I think they can only get free WLS if they are under a BMI 50. Can't remember what their equivalent to medicare is.

 

Other than that, the only time I've heard this is when people are very very high BMIs and it is deemed too unsafe to operate until their BMI comes down.

 

UK has the NHS (National Health Service).  Although from the TV series "Fat Doctor" it would appear that everyone can get bariatric surgery under the NHS it just isn't the case.  My brother tried to get weightloss surgery on the NHS at the start of the year but was told that he wasn't heavy enough!!  His BMI at the time was about 48.  In the end he paid for it himself and has lost 44 kg since the middle of Feb.  He was my inspiration to go for the surgery myself :)

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the only way to get your answer is to contact the clinics. my bmi was 44 and there was no question.

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Thanks for all your responses..... I did a calculation on my BMI and it is really high. I am scared that now that I am wanting to go ahead with lapband surgery that I won't be able to.

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Thanks for all your responses..... I did a calculation on my BMI and it is really high. I am scared that now that I am wanting to go ahead with lapband surgery that I won't be able to.

I would go see a surgeon if it was me...you'll never know until you ask :)

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No I have. If your BMI is really really high then it may no longer be safe to perform the surgery and they can refuse to operate unless the BMI is reduced to a lower level. Don't ask me what is considered really really high though. I know that "Big Kev" from biggest loser australia was 250kg ish and he was refused WLS as it wasn't safe for them to perform the surgery (ie they thought he could die on the operating table). And by "know" I mean they mentioned it briefly on the BL this year after he returned. My BMI when I was banded was 48ish.

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The hospital I was banded at had a BMI limit of 50, if you were above that they refused to put you under a general anesthetic.

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My BMI was 48ish as well, I was on Optifast for 5 weeks and lost 14.8kgs, which brought it down a lot. You're a much higher surgical risk with a high BMI, you'll stay in a High Dependency Unit at least overnight in most cases. Go and see someone, I just made an appointment, no GP referral. They might put you on Optifast for longer but that's also to shrink your liver.

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IN Queensland I believe you need to have a 40BMI to get the surgery or a 60BMI to get it done in the public hospital on Medicare.  I had mine done privately but it failed so they let me into the public system to get it corrected despite my BMI.  It is nice to be the skinniest person in teh room for a change but the public system waiting list is around a year.

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A BMI of 60 to get it done publically seems ridiculous, many hospitals won't operate on people with a BMI of over 50 due to the risk of anaesthetic complications. Lucky for me the requirements in WA for public lists are much better.

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I have my apppointment in three weeks and I'm really nervous that that the surgeon will say I don't need surgery. I have a BMI of 30. I'm scared that he will say use the shakes or something, My weight saga, like others has been going on for years!! I am seeing Dr Watson in Perth.

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UK has the NHS (National Health Service).  Although from the TV series "Fat Doctor" it would appear that everyone can get bariatric surgery under the NHS it just isn't the case.  My brother tried to get weightloss surgery on the NHS at the start of the year but was told that he wasn't heavy enough!!  His BMI at the time was about 48.  In the end he paid for it himself and has lost 44 kg since the middle of Feb.  He was my inspiration to go for the surgery myself :)

The NICE guidelines in the UK say over 40 or over 35 with co-morbidities. The problem is each NHS Trust (each trust covers and manages a certain area, normally around a big town or city) has their own limits which further restricts by age, upper or lower BMIs. For example Bristol says you have to be under 35 years of age and Gwent says you have to be over 50 BMI, yet these trusts are right next to each other. That's why health in the UK is called a postcode lottery. Your postcode will even determine what cancer drugs a person can get. To top it off private health companies still call it "cosmetic" and won't cover it.

I am so pleased I moved back to Australia, which has enabled me to have the bypass. I couldn't afford to pay the whole cost myself in the UK.

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