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skeeter

Minimizer Ring for Sleeve

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I just got a letter from my surgeon asking if I want a minimizer ring fitted when I have the sleeve. Apparently it's this new thing and it's to help prevent stretching. It won't cost me any more, and it's done while he's doing the sleeve. He says it doesn't cause any issues with scarring etc. Just wondering if anyone has had one of these?

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Sorry I don't know anything, but why is it free? Anything that is put into the body is expensive, so how is it there is no additional charge? Is the manufacturer using the surgeon's outcomes as part of a study? If it was me, I'd be asking the surgeon why it is free so that you have all the facts.

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I've heard of these anecdotally through another forum. If it is the same sort of thing they were talking about on there, it is pretty much like a cable tie that gets tied around the top of your sleeve and one that is also being used for stretched bypass pouches. It's not adjustable like lap bands are.

 

Having had the band and what can happen there with stuck food, blockages, PBs, etc, I personally would be loathe to have a similar device (and one that is not adjustable either!!) put in to me. I am enjoying being able to chew and swallow my food without fear of it coming back up at me or sitting above my band causing me all sorts of pain and suffering.

 

I would ask the surgeon the following sort of questions - how many have they fitted and to what success rate? how long has this been used? and has it been used on virgin sleevers?  or stretched sleeves? on what basis does he know it doesn't cause scarring...what about weakening of the oesophageal sphincter? does it cause that? what if it is too tight? what then? what about slips and erosion? how would it affect post op recovery? because your sleeved tummy is literally the size of an egg cup due to swelling, wouldn't this make it worse and more difficult to drink and eat particularly post op? Given that stress and anxiety can cause a lap band to become tighter, what effect does this device have on a smaller sleeved stomach?

 

so many questions!

 

Who knows? perhaps this is the new solution for longer term WLS?

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My two cents..

New medical technology/procedures take a while for quality evidence to be gathered about their risks and benefits. These bands appear to be a recent development. There are studies that follow thousands of people who had the sleeve (and many more for the lap band), it will be some time before this will be available for sleeve + another factor.

It might offer a second-stage procedure if the sleeve doesn't deliver.

I have read that close follow-up is demonstrated to increase chances of satisfactory loss - this is my plan for sleeve-stretching-prevention!

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I agree with all that Missy Belle has said. You need a lot more information. Who will take responsibility if there are any problems would be #1 on my list.

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Maybe they need some bunnies for further testing/studies about it.

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Thanks everyone I will definitely be asking some of these questions on Monday when I see the surgeon. Reducing the risk of stretching seems like a good plan, but I don't see how this ring won't rub or cause scarring. Also worried if it is too tight I might get stuck moments? The doctors letter says it is fully funded by my health cover so that is why it is no more cost when done during the op I am already paying for.

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The sleeve will only stretch out if you eat too much. That is where the head work comes into play.

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I believe that it is widely documented that regardless of what procedure is used, those that continue to follow up with their clinic/surgeon over the long term generally have the better weight loss results.

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I believe that it is widely documented that regardless of what procedure is used, those that continue to follow up with their clinic/surgeon over the long term generally have the better weight loss results.

yeah, but let's face it if you haven't lost any weight or have increased in weight then you typically don't want to see your surgeon. So maybe those that are doing well are just more likely to have regular visits with their surgeon. Just because their is a correlation doesn't mean there has to be causation.
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In context, one benefit of the sleeve is that there is less long-term follow-up involving the surgeon. This contrasts with higher risk of malnutrition.

My team for long-term care is my GP, Dietician and physician, i like the sense of accountability within these relationships. I didn't involve a psychologist as I work in mental health and I felt this wouldn't aid in my decision making or ability to cope. I have seen a psychotherapist in the past and would consider returning to this if I feel "off-track".

The main issue that concerns me about the ring is whether the risk of leak is altered. Without the risk of leak, the sleeve would be completely ideal for many people.

After more than a decade watching medical literature, I'll be very interested to see where the band/sleeve/ring progression finalises

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Missy_Belle - I disagree with your comment and I am sure that any clinic would as well.

 

I know that at my clinic those that catch up regularly seem to demonstrate better success...those that only check in spasmodically tend to do not as well.

 

What the chicken or the egg is, is subjective because does someone stop checking in because they aren't doing so well? or do the not do well directly as a result of not making themselves accountable to their surgical team and not checking in?

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Even when we are obese malnutrition is an issue.  When we go into the planning of this we need to work out up front how to deal with the smaller portions and how we will get all the nutrients we need. If we are embarking on bariatric surgery for the sake of our health then we stand a better chance of avoiding malnutrition. Doing it to simply look good places us at a greater risk. I have not had any of the common issues such as hair loss, fatigue (except for the first couple of weeks when we are on liquids) etc and all my bloods have come back perfect. Researching the food groups and working them into what you like is an important preparation.

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good idea Victorious...I see on other forums in particular that some people seem to think it is a race to lose the most in the shortest period of time. It doesn't seem to take too many months for them to start posting up about excessive hair loss, brittle nails, dental problems, etc, etc and 'complaining' that their dietitian/doctor wants them to eat more nutritious food, etc.

 

What also saddens and upsets me are other members who are following all the rules and doing very well in their own right complaining that they have 'ONLY' lost x amount of weight...some of these members have lost an average of 1-2kgs per week over the course of their time (sometimes more) and feel like they have failed because of others who have lost even more (one lady has lost 75-80 kgs in 10 months! and is now a size 8)

 

I really truly think that a holistic attitude towards this experience is important...that it's not just about the numbers of the scale, it is about overall health and wellbeing.  

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good idea Victorious...I see on other forums in particular that some people seem to think it is a race to lose the most in the shortest period of time. It doesn't seem to take too many months for them to start posting up about excessive hair loss, brittle nails, dental problems, etc, etc and 'complaining' that their dietitian/doctor wants them to eat more nutritious food, etc.

 

What also saddens and upsets me are other members who are following all the rules and doing very well in their own right complaining that they have 'ONLY' lost x amount of weight...some of these members have lost an average of 1-2kgs per week over the course of their time (sometimes more) and feel like they have failed because of others who have lost even more (one lady has lost 75-80 kgs in 10 months! and is now a size 8)

 

I really truly think that a holistic attitude towards this experience is important...that it's not just about the numbers of the scale, it is about overall health and wellbeing.  

I can't imagine losing 80kgs in only 10 months. She must have been dropping a size every couple of weeks. Her average daily calorie intake must be tiny to drop at such a rate. It took me 3 years to lose 70kgs and I haven't had any health problems (except for some excess skin).

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I lost 60kg in 10 1/2 months but I ate or drank nothing that I did not need.  Almost everything was raw, organic and there was a huge volume of fresh vegetable juice in there, nuts and seeds, fruit in season, very little dairy or meat but I had it when I felt that I needed it. Avocado, home made almond milk with lightly cooked quinoa. No alcohol either. It might not work for anyone else but my body has responded remarkably and I have reversed the coronary artery disease and the insulin resistance.

 

The first few weeks with the sleeve were wobbly and I didn't really eat enough but I did my best. After that everything was fine.

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she claims she kept to a strict 800-900 calories a day, walking for exercise, no carbs, sugar, salt, only ate organic food, etc, etc...she has since had a body lift/tummy tuck and breast augmentation.

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I'm trying to work on improving my diet. I just love the taste of sweet and salty and that means I still eat a lot of processed food. I am trying to focus on eating whole foods as I don't overeat real food. Processed food manufactured to be delicious on the other hand, I will overeat.

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I hear you loud and clear!

 

the Meniere's Disease diagnosis really opened my eyes to how truly (not sure of the right word so will throw some out here) crap, dangerous, unnatural, synthetic processed food is...and how reliant I was on that kind of food! It was a huge awakening!!

 

I had been on 'real/whole food' lifestyle changes before when I used to see a naturopath and I was amazed to see how vastly improved my skin, sleep patterns, mind set, hair, nails, breath, energy levels were.

 

On a side note, my mum has a phrase that she uses often - that we dig our graves with our teeth.

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I was offered that option too, and my surgeon said it seemed to increase success chances. However, as I am a band-to-sleever, I had a horror of facing that "restriction-stuck-vomit" cycle again, as that was the main reason for getting the band out in the first place. The band worked really well for me for the first few years, but the last few years with it became more and more difficult and the idea of putting another one in place, especially one that couldn't be adjusted, just seemed counter-productive.

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I asked my surgeon about the sleever ring at my last check up and he believes they are going to have a lot of problems with them and won't go near them.

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as an ex-bandit, I would stay well clear of a restriction band/ring.

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I had one placed when I got sleeved. They are placed very loose so no chance of eroding into the stomace. They are there to prevent streatching. Not to give restriction. Any way I have no idea what the long term effects are going to be. But more and more long term surgeries patients  are putting on weight, So I think the surgeons are looking for ways to help prevent it.

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Wow, this is my post from ages ago... I did get a minimizer ring and have had no troubles with it...

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Hi skeeter I'm new to this site but your query is the exact same query that I have.  Had my last appt with surgeon yesterday and he out of the blue told me that they would also be inserting a minimiser ring during my sleeve surgery.  It was the first I'd heard about it and was super skeptical as I was probably likening it to all the horror stories I'd heard about the band.  So I said at this point I don't want it until I find out a bit more about it and that I will let him know before my surgery on 3 August.  My Surgeon has also been sleeved so I asked him if he has a minimiser ring and he said he didn't. I asked him why and he said that the surgeon he had didn't do them.  So my dilemma, to have or not to have the minimiser ring as well?  Do you have any restriction when eating like banded people do?  Do you notice it is there?  Thanks Skeeter

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