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This one's for experienced bandits.

After getting a band, and ensuring you stay in the green zone, is it at all possible to put on all of the excess weight that has been lost?

I am a volume eater, which I'm assuming makes a difference to the answer to this question :)

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Sorry to tell you this but yes it is possible to regain lost weight. It is not a miracle cure, it is lifelong commitment to dieting and excercise.

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Completely understand that. When you say 'dieting', what exactly do you mean? High protein, low carb? Low fat? Shakes? Salads? Palio?

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Nathan I think the band is intended to assist with portion control. It does make me feel full after a small meal but I have to rely on my own willpower not to eat after I feel full. I love food and its proving difficult. But I have not vomited yet so I am assuming that I am not over eating. My surgeon told me I would vomit if I over eat... So I think I am ok?? Maybe the more experienced banders can offer their advice.. Oh and then its also up to you to stick to healthier options as best you can

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Depends what your definition of "overeat" is. If you eat all day you are still overeating as you are consuming too many calories and this is still possible with the band. Don't ever think that just because you lose a few kilos after being banded that that weight can't come back on. Within 2 years of being banded I was back at my pre-banding weight. Over the years I lost the same 30 to 40kgs three times over. I am now over 70kgs down and have been that way for the past year (now 14 years post banding). Staying at my weight requires a constant effort to watch what I eat and to loosely track in my head the calories I consume so I don't put weight back on. I always want to eat and when I think about it about 90% of the time I'm not physically hungry yet I want to eat. And that false hunger is something the band can't help with because it is not a physical hunger.

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I am only 3 weeks post op, so I do not have the experience of the lap band, but my experience on the eating comparisons (this is info I was curious about before too) is it is frustrating at this stage I am at.

My previous eating habits do sound similar to posts you have made nathan. Eat to excess, leftovers = snacks any time of day or night, pick all day, constant eating and when it is "formal meals" it is serious chow down time of very large portions. Perhaps in front of the TV? On the couch leaning on the arm rest so the posture is bad to start with for digestion...so even before I start, I am not concentrating on how fast I shovel, how much I am consuming and the angle at which it is going down for me to even feel full (I learned that from a nutritionist). 

However now, it is dainty portions, slow eating and it's become a very mindful process of how, where, why and what is going on. Perhaps practice will make this more enjoyable, more experienced bandits can validate or invalidate that, I'm just not sure. 

But for me at the moment, it is a military precision operation. And as missy_belle said, when I wanna eat too, 90% of the time it's the head talking, not the tummy and there is not alot that can be done about that except distraction distraction and more distraction.  

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Nearly 3 years in - serious head hunger every day, a battle every day.  But think I am slowly winning  :lol: .  I too have gained and lost the kilos.  Grazing all day does it for me.  My new rule is no snacking at all, have a drink, walk, clean my teeth (find that works well).  I also get bad shoulder pain if i overeat.  The main thing i tell myself is this is not a diet, this is the rest of my life - and its pretty good - Best Wishes

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My experience has been that in the first 12 months, the reduction in volume alone was enough to shift most of my excess weight.

 

Nearly 2 years in, it's very easy for a bandit to eat too many calories. You would have to be fairly committed to eating nothing but sliders to gain weight quickly, but it's very easy for my caloric intake to reach 1500 a day if I'm not being careful.

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My experience has been that in the first 12 months, the reduction in volume alone was enough to shift most of my excess weight.

 

Nearly 2 years in, it's very easy for a bandit to eat too many calories. You would have to be fairly committed to eating nothing but sliders to gain weight quickly, but it's very easy for my caloric intake to reach 1500 a day if I'm not being careful.

For me sliders where the problem to begin with, so it was very easy for me to consume the same amount of sliders that I did pre-surgery which meant I could easily consume 3,000 + calories a day causing my weight to rapidly increase back to pre-surgery weight within 2 years post op.

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I'm only 6 weeks banded but know that you have to watch the sliders. If you're struggling it might be helpful to keep a food diary (be honest) as this might help you with your own accountability, and easily allows you to see where those extra calories are sneaking in. I've found that head hunger is difficult, if I have a hot drink and this fills me I know I wasn't really hungry (it is hard), as AngelButterfly said distraction is key; if you think you're hungry and you distract yourself by doing something does your hunger go away, if so you're not hungry. When I'm not doing anything I get bored and this is when the head hunger is at it's worst. Interestingly hubby has likened his experience with the pre-op diet to quitting smoking. When the hunger pangs hit if he can do something to distract himself the craving will (usually) go away, which is what happens whenever he gets a craving for a cigarette (he hasn't smoked in about 11 years but still gets the occasional craving).

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I'm only 6 weeks banded but know that you have to watch the sliders. If you're struggling it might be helpful to keep a food diary (be honest) as this might help you with your own accountability, and easily allows you to see where those extra calories are sneaking in. I've found that head hunger is difficult, if I have a hot drink and this fills me I know I wasn't really hungry (it is hard), as AngelButterfly said distraction is key; if you think you're hungry and you distract yourself by doing something does your hunger go away, if so you're not hungry. When I'm not doing anything I get bored and this is when the head hunger is at it's worst. Interestingly hubby has likened his experience with the pre-op diet to quitting smoking. When the hunger pangs hit if he can do something to distract himself the craving will (usually) go away, which is what happens whenever he gets a craving for a cigarette (he hasn't smoked in about 11 years but still gets the occasional craving).

 

Former smoker here too, 3 years ago I quit and occasionally I find a distraction is needed for the cigs. I need some really good distractions in my life now LOL!!

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By sliders are you talking yoghurts, alcohol, milkshakes, ice creams etc?

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.all of the above...……and of course chocolates.

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By sliders are you talking yoghurts, alcohol, milkshakes, ice creams etc?

Can also be rice cakes and biscuits, chips (crisps), twisties etc. for some reason it does not have to be a 'smooth' food to be a slider.

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That's exciting because I'm not a fan of any of those things :)

Only cheese really but not even that is too common for me. 7eleven have sugarfree slurpees!

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Hi I have been banded 1.5 years and still finding it hard I have put on about 7 kgs since Xmas it is stressing me out ...I haven't been exercising but just started again so hoping it will drop off again...people thinks it's a quick fix but you have to train yr brain not to eat when yr not hungry and only small portions ...I still struggle with portion size...

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A life long commitment to eating healthy and exercising and you can say good bye to being a volume eater.

Today I'm home from work and for lunch and had 2 slices of cheese and now I'm full  :(

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Does anyone think if you eat sliders they can fill you up and when you go to eat something like rice or chicken you cannot eat it because you had too many slider foods , I am realising I am eating a lot of sliders(yougurts .custard ,icecream ,chocolate) because other food is not staying down, I am nearly at my ideal weight and wondering should I have a bit of fill out so I can eat healthier and stop with the sliders, I eat when I am not hungry (wish I didn't)

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had no sliders today and just ate a bit of casserole and it was fine. I have an appointment next week with the clinic so for a week I am eating no sliders and see if I can eat more healthy before getting any fill out. Thanks for replying eggzy

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