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Zendaya

Band v's Sleeve - Opions Wanted Pls !?!?

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Hi I am booked in to have my band in nov, but can't help wondering how you decided on the  band or sleeve?  For me I have about 30kgs to loose - I currently walk at least 5 klms every day and seem to be going an average job with my food, I think the band will be that extra tool to get me to my goal and stay there, no more over eating, and eating crap and leftovers 24-7

 

Interested to hear everyones stories if you are happy to share with me?

 

Thanks in advance Zen :)

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I decided on a sleeve despite being a lower BMI because it seemed to fit with what I want from my life. I am planning on working in third world countries throughout my life, being quite remote at times, and I also like to travel to remote places for leisure as well. For me, the number one issue with the band was the issue of filling and taking out fill when I do travel. Since I travel regularly now, and I can only see that continuing, I decided that if the band was the only option, I wasn't going to go with weight loss surgery. As well as that, my doctor was worried about the issue of vomiting with the band as I have a long history of eating disorders, mainly bulimia. My doctor and his team felt that my reasons for wanting the sleeve were worth considering and, at the end of the day, it was my body and I needed to be happy with the decision. 

 

Whilst I felt quite uneasy about the idea of the band, I am very happy about my decision to have the sleeve.

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Hi Zendaya

 

Firstly, congratulations on your decision to have weightloss surgery!

 

I have had a lap band and now I have a sleeve.

 

What I like about the sleeve is that it is not adjustable, you are in the 'green zone' right from day one. No mucking about with fills/adjustments, no guess work and ongoing maintenance with your surgeon is next to nil (except to check in with your clinic/surgeon and dietician every now and again). Because the sleeve operation removes the part of the stomach that produces the ghrelin (hunger) hormone, disinterest in food and lack of hunger is common. There has been a biochemical change within me - I no longer crave food...if I eat chocolate for example, it is out of habit or that I remember that I used to like it. Very strange but very cool.

 

The lap band has it's advantages - yes it is removable and it is adjustable. However, it can take some time (months or longer) to find the 'green zone' (the optimal amount of fill that enables you to eat small meals and stay satisfied for longer). Some people find their green zone early on, which is great news for them. I feel that the band requires a much longer commitment to stay in touch with your clinic/surgeon because there is so much that can potentially go wrong throughout the whole life of the band. That said, yes a leak can occur with a sleeve at any time but are most common in the first month of surgery.

 

In the 3+ years that I was banded, I was visiting my clinic for an adjustment (to make it looser or tighter) every 6-8 weeks. That is a LOT of needles in the belly and a LOT of mucking about. It may take a few fills before you really start to experience what restrictive surgery is like.

 

Not everyone has this experience, not everyone has the issues that I had with the lap band so this is not typical. However...read on this forum with people making comments and asking questions and generally worrying about whether or not they might be in the red zone, have a slip, pouch, oesophageal dilation, flipped port, leak, etc.

 

The disadvantages of the sleeve include malnutrition issues - my hair is starting to fall out (not in chunks, there is just a carpet of hair in the bathroom every morning!) due to lack of protein. There is a very fine line between under-eating, over-eating and eating the correct types and amount of food/nutrients in order to live healthily, lose weight and get on with life. I am still trying to find my feet with this - I recently gained a small amount of weight so it is very much a work in progress.

 

You can experience malnutrition issues with the lap band - I was forever being told off by my GP for being anaemic and being low in Vitamin B. I don't seem to have these deficiencies with the sleeve but I am now deficient in potassium so I have to take a supplement every day for this.

 

Each procedure has it's advantages and disadvantages. They are both tools that have to be treated with respect and used to their advantages. No you cannot expect to eat a smaller version of a crappy diet and expect to have amazeball results. Yes we all have to choose to eat healthy food and exercise appropriately to our situation.

 

In the whole time I had the lap band, I felt like a patient. As a sleever, I feel like a normal person who eats small meals. I don't have to worry about whether a meal is going to get stuck, make me throw up, is it going to cooperate with the band. I like that I can eat pretty much any kind of food with the sleeve. With the lap band I was unable to eat fresh tomato, apples, pears, plums, apricots (pretty much anything with a skin), yoghurt, custard, chicken breast, stir fried vegetables, some salad vegetables, some breads (unless slathered with butter to lube it up) and many other things. I couldn't just grab a sandwich for lunch as the bread would get stuck. I'd have to ensure that I chewed 20+ times on each side of my mouth, that I cut my food into tiny pieces, swallow and count to 20, wait and see if it got stuck before taking another bite. Sometimes I would do everything right, chew well, breathe, relax, etc, etc and STILL have food get stuck and block my band...then the saliva would build up and then up it'd come. 

 

The lap band disordered my eating.

 

Not every bandit has issues with these foods, some cant eat steak or prawns or any kind of salad, for example. Some are able to eat pretty much anything they want.

 

Talk to your surgeon, ask them plenty of questions and take the option they recommend to you.

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Zen, I have a band and I love it. I also know a few other bandits and our experiences have definitely been different. As others have said it is a personal choice and it is important to talk to your surgeon about options to suit your lifestyle and any concerns/questions that you may have. Good luck with whatever WLS you choose.

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It's a great way to start the Band v Sleeve argument.

After doing all the research, the only person who can make the decision is YOU.

 

The band works well for some and not others

The sleeve works well for some and not others

There are short and long term benefits and drawbacks to both (and other) WLS

Some have gone from the band to the sleeve

I haven't read of anyone go from the sleeve to the band (could be because the can't?)

Both are safe from a medical perspective!

 

All that said, once the Op date gets closer we all have doubts and 2nd thoughts and even more so just after the Op!

Be strong, make YOUR decision and follow it through, you won't know how either the band or sleeve will work with you until after the Op.

 

Good luck

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I mirror everything everyone has said, but for me I chose the lap band because it is removable and adjustable. I was banded at 25 (two years ago) and I have had some regrets (constant vigilance with eating is the main one), but other than that, it's been a great experience. One thing I would like to highlight is that with any weight loss surgery - at end of the day, it comes down to you and your choices. At the beginning of whichever journey you choose, it is likely that you will lose weight without that much change to what you are eating - portion sizes will account for a lot of your weight loss. However, after 12-24 months, your lower body weight will adjust to this new 'normal' pattern of eating and what you are eating will make a difference. I've been stable/losing slowly for 6 months because I still eat borderline slider foods. A lot of food groups are now off limits to me, and the desire to use the latest diet trend comes back. I've recently lost 4-5kgs because I have introduced more exercise and stopped snacking. Constant vigilance for the band, whereas as it seems more "set and forget" with the sleeve. Just my opinion anyway :)

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it doesn't matter which option you choose, you have to be so vigilant with food for different reasons

 

I have learned that (with the sleeve) there is a REALLY fine line between undereating, overeating and eating juuuust the right amount to lose weight. The band was somewhat more flexible in this matter. With the sleeve I need to eat 800 calories and no more in order to lose weight consistently. With the band I found it was around 1000 calories. I'm not sure if this is because I am an ex-bandit and my body is more adjusted to a reduced calorie diet than a newbie or if it is a peculiarity of the sleeve.

 

I think the biggest difference between the two (in one way) is that you have to be so careful to ensure you chew really, really well and eat slowly with the band. With the sleeve there really isn't much chance of something getting stuck but you do have to eat slowly (because overeating can happen so easily).

 

I feel that it takes around 2 years to really get the hang of living with WLS - leading up to this point is very much a learning curve, and a very steep one at that!

 

One aspect that I wasn't prepared for and didn't consider was having to deal with stress/emotional issues and other psychological issues that previously had me eating to deal with it. I have had to learn to deal with life's little problems/hiccups in other ways and it has been a MASSIVE learning curve!

 

Regardless, 90% or more of this is psychological with the WLS tool being the icing on the cake

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Oh sorry, that's not what I meant by constant vigilance, I don't think I explained myself properly. Perhaps constant vigilance was the wrong expression. I just meant the band can be a little more 'fiddly' with chewing and fills and stuck moments etc :)

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I know what you meant :) I didn't explain myself properly!

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Hi Kazbo, how long ago did you have the sleeve done to replace the band???

 

I am now facing a similar issue due to an issue with the band moving and have been offered the sleeve as an alternative and like the idea you don't need to have the band adjusted when you want to travel overseas or getting into the zone....

 

I was also interested to read your comments about the removal of the part of the stomach that contains the ghrelin hormone and your change in food tastes/requirements??? Can you explain this a bit more???

 

Cheers,

Richard

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Hi Richard

 

I am always happy to answer any questions about my own experience :)

 

I had my lap band removed in early November 2013, waited 17 weeks (my surgeon prefers to wait a minimum of 16 weeks in between, longer if possible) and I had my sleeve op 5 March 2014.

 

I hated having to do the optifast diet all over again and really, really struggled with it. I ended up doing a real food VLCD option as I have lactose intolerance...but it was so worth it.

 

As far as the ghrelin thing goes, this is how I understand it (it has also been research and documented widely so feel free to google away!).

 

The part of the stomach that is removed is the main ghrelin producing part of the body. Ghrelin is the hormone that is identified as the 'hunger hormone' it's what tells the brain/body that we are hungry and need food. When this part of the stomach is removed, the body really doesn't produce this hormone. Therefore the biochemical drive/desire/ability to feel hunger is gone. I am of the understanding that the body starts working out how to produce ghrelin after around 18 months or so, but it isn't nearly as 'bad' as before. There are even some researchers who postulate that for some obese people, they over eat because of an over production of this hormone, I and tend to agree with these findings because no one could ever understand why I could eat so much and still be hungry. But I digress...

 

I cant explain why my tastes have changed so much but I find it interesting that pretty much all my previous 'go to' or 'comfort' foods no longer do anything for me. I literally get bored with eating. I tend to prefer to eat more healthier food. It just seems 'easier' and 'more satisfying' to me to eat healthier options. I also enjoy FLAVOUR now...I've become a bit of a foodie and I now savour and really enjoy food and eating as opposed to it controlling me. Some foods just taste gross now - lollies for example just taste so sickly sweet and chemically.

 

That said, there are some things that I still eat mainly out of habit - I remember that I used to eat these things in certain situations (popcorn and maltesers at the movies, for example). I don't actually LIKE eating maltesers anymore, they taste foul but I have bought them out of habit. I'll have 1-2 and then in the rest. I am still learning to not buy food 'just because' but to really think about whether I am hungry and how far out I am from 'meal time'. I rarely snack these days...although potato chips are still a habitual snack that I don't crave or want as such, I just eat them out of habit. So yeah, it is still a work in progress!

 

I have reported and posted up about my increasing hunger with the sleeve and this is attributed to silent reflux, that masks itself as fluttery butterfly sensations in the stomach that feel like hunger pains. I have changed my reflux meds and this has settled down.

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In your shoes, I'd choose the band - your BMI is at the lower end when it comes to WLS so it makes sense to get the less invasive procedure. B) it doesn't involve removal of anything, c) sounds like you already have some control over what you eat so I think you stand to be very successful with the band and c) once you reach a good weight, you can get it unfilled and your stomach returns to normal (should you wish). There's evidence to suggest that while the sleeve produces quicker results initially at the 2 year mark, both procedures achieve similar results. 

 

Obviously there are down-sides, too - it can take a while to adjust to the band and get the fill level right and this will require numerous trips to your clinic. Mine is close by and open on Saturdays so there's no issue but if you don't live close to your clinic, it can be a hassle. Many people have issues with vomiting because eating really, really slowly is easier said than done. But you learn. Pouch formation after a few years is also not uncommon - while for most people this is easily fixed with an unfill and a bit of time to let things settle, mine now requires fixing or replacing which is another surgical procedure. 

 

My concern with the sleeve is that over time, you can stretch the stomach and once this happens, so there's not much you can do (or so I read) - whereas you can always get your fill topped up with the band if you get to a point where you're eating more. I've never had more than 5ml in my 11ml band and that was pretty tight so obviously there's a lot of room for tightening should you need it...I don't think many people get filled anywhere near the maximum. 

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Disclaimer - this post is unashamedly pro-sleeve and anti-lap band and I make no apologies for voicing my personal opinion

 

I found that getting a needle in my belly every time I needed an adjustment to be far more invasive that the sleeve. I also found that having a foreign object implanted into my body was completely unnatural and invasive. I couldn't lie on my belly or wear button waisted pants/skirts when I was banded because it hurt my port. If I wore tightly waisted clothes, the food would literally be pushed out of my pouch when I sat down. I don't believe that this is a common occurrence with the band but it was upsetting and embarrassing. I didn't want to have to wear loose and elastic waisted clothes the rest of my life!

 

I get really frustrated and feel concerned when people talk about how lap banding is a 'safer option' and that it is the 'easier' option - it's for these reasons that I got the band in the first place, even though the surgeon recommended the sleeve to me at the time. The band can and does cause scarring on the stomach so whilst the band is removable, it does damage the stomach. And sometimes this damage can be terrible and may not repair - ever.

 

With the lap band you can cause a pouch dilation above the band through over eating. You can also dilate the oesophagus  through overeating. So overeating can cause as much damage with the band than can be caused with the sleeve. In fact it can be even more dangerous. And that's before we think about all the other things that can go wrong over the life of the band - dilation, slips, leaks, port flips, port detachments, erosion, etc, etc.

 

With the sleeve it is like having a non-sleeved stomach in every sense except that it can't hold much. It works exactly the same as it did before, no food gets stuck, there is no need to worry about chewing food to a paste before swallowing.

 

There is no guesswork with the sleeve, with the band it may take a couple of fills to get to the right spot or it might take several dozen to get to the right spot. You may never get to the right spot to enjoy the green zone. With the sleeve you are in the 'green zone' right from day 1.

 

Yes you can stretch the sleeve, it's true, and re-sleeving may be required if it stretches out enough. It will never, ever stretch back to it's original size - it's impossible.

 

I'm not saying that the sleeve is god's gift to WLS and it may not be for everyone...hell, in the short few months that my lap band was in the green zone and all was working well, it was FREAKING AWESOME and I loved it. But to have enjoyed that for 3-4 months over 3 years is not good enough for me - the band disordered my eating. I have enjoyed the epic green zone with the sleeve right from day 1 and it is awesome. Yes I still have to make good decisions and I'm not saying I am perfect, I do get frustrated with the limitations of the sleeve at times and I am still learning to fully utilise this tool.

 

But in my own personal opinion, the sleeve is so vastly superior, reliable, safer and effective than the band could ever hope to be and there is no choice.

 

And hey - if someone has a lap band and it works for them, and they are happy with it, more power to them and I wish them the very best of luck and good health with it.

 

But for anyone considering which option to take I would encourage them to listen to the recommendation of their surgeon in the first instance. In the second instance I would recommend they scroll through the threads on this website with all the posts about worries, concerns and ongoing complications with the lap band.

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I'm OK with either surgery but got the band as it was on public system and I had no choice, Ive had no really bad issues with the band although today I'm suffering because I ate something I should not have and vomited enough to make my inners swell so the band is seriously tight at the moment and I'm on liquids. Hopefully this will settle quickly. My sister has a sleeve and she also vomits and is still in the learning process, has gone through sugar dumping etc. I have friends both banded and sleeved, both types Ive seen success and failure.  I also have a friend who spent over a month in hospital after being sleeved due to complications with the surgery, its not to be taken lightly even though it is safe.  I also have read of people in USA who have band over sleeve, not something Ive seen in Australia.  If Id had a choice Id have probably taken the sleeve, mainly because i live 500ks from the city where my surgeon is. As for fills, i must have the best doctor on the planet as Ive never felt much anytime Ive had a fill.  99% of the time my band is great, just once in a while I stuff up and don't chew enough or I forget I'm banded and eat too fast, however my sister has over done it with the sleeve and gone through similar pain.  I don't know what the future holds for me, I may stay banded quite happily or I may pursue the sleeve  later, not sure. Personally Id rather not have more surgery as Ive had a lot of surgeries in my 55 years and don't fancy more.  What ever you choose, its a learning curve and from all Ive read on both, after around the two year mark they even up weight loss wise, also its still not the end of dieting in my opinion. as someone who has been overweight for most of my life I'm slowly accepting that I will have to be vigilant with my diet until the day I peg out.

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Thanks for the info Kazbo, greatly appreciated..... Your comment on silent refux is a bit of a concern as it was the reflux problems with my band that led me to have it checked in the first place. I thought switching to the sleeve would remove the reflux issue???

 

I am presently on somac for the reflux with the band and was hoping to come off this medication and hoping to get back to a semi normal sleep pattern with the sleeve, is this not the case??

 

Sorry, I know this thread was a comparison of the band versus sleeve and as having the band for past 4 years without previous issues I thought it was great and the sleeve seems to be without problems but am concerned that reflux can still be an issue with the sleeve and still requires medication...

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for an ex-bandit, reflux MAY become an even bigger problem with the sleeve.

 

I was advised by Dr Jorgensen in Sydney (brilliant surgeon but sadly lacking in social graces) that the lap band can make the oesophageal sphincter lazy because as much as the band is effective at keeping food OUT of the stomach, it is also very good at keeping the stomach acid and food in the stomach, in the stomach and UNDER the band. No one ever talks about that little complication when they wax lyrical about how the band can be removed!

 

Take the band out and this 'restriction' is also gone...that's why a lot of ex-bandits complain about reflux and food 'falling' out of the stomach. I had terrible acid reflux the first month or so post-band removal. Also had issues with my food and drink literally falling out of my stomach if I bent over or exercised vigorously too soon after eating or drinking. I recall being at the gym and using the leg curl machine and I literally spat up a mouthful of water I had swallowed a few minutes earlier...much like how a new born baby spits. This did resolve itself after a month or so.

 

I was told by Dr Jorgensen that the sleeve MAY resolve reflux for SOME people...but it is more common/usual for the sleeve (especially band to sleeve) to make reflux worse. If it cannot be resolved/corrected with medication, then the only solution is a gastric bypass.

 

Anyone considering band removal and then further WLS needs to really consider and be prepared for the possibility that a bypass may be an eventual (or only) WLS option for them.

 

I have silent reflux now and I guess time will tell if the increased Somac makes a difference. I had already come to terms with the fact that I may have uncontrolled reflux with the sleeve and I am mentally prepared for the possibility of a bypass if required...because I was warned that it may be a possibility. That said, I'd rather avoid any further surgery if I can help it!

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This debate is always interesting and I can't not weigh in. I am very early on in my band experience and my experience has been totally positive. I have 2 friends who have been incredibly successful with the sleeve. And 2 friend with okay Band experiences and 1 with a great story. I had lunch with one of them today (Sleeve) she looks amazing 3 mths out and I think she has lost about 26kgs. She is very happy with her decision but did say she felt incredibly nauseous for the first 8 weeks and she can't handle rich, spicy or lactose. I just live seeing her full of confidence again We are both supportive about our choices. I will say this and this friend would agree whilst banding can have horrible complications and it obviously doesn't suit everyone it is the safe option. My surgeon (Dr Bowden) who does all the WLS wrote it down for me. Death resulting from Banding is 1 in 3000 and with Sleeving it is 1 in 300. Sleevers may correct me and please do so but that is what my surgeon told me and confirmed in writing. I hope I continue on a positive banding journey because some of the bad side effects are horrible. Fingers crossed. Goodluck everyone and ultimately your decision is your own but being a Mum of 3 those numbers made me decide that the band was for me. Okay before you fire up that doesn't mean I judge Mum's who choose Sleeving. I am pro woman being happy, confident and strong. Go Girls!!!!

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My surgeon's office told me death after sleeving was about 1:700, about the same as a gall bladder. Remember too, that often it's not the procedure, but some other underlying complication or anaesthesia which ends up being the problem, rather than a problem from the WLS procedure. That's why most surgeon's are so thorough about making you jump through hoops first - heart checks, respiration checks, physician checks, etc etc etc.

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I wonder where they get their stats from? the numbers really do depend on what sample they research and therefore actual statistics will vary widely.

 

For example, if my clinic used their own statistics, they would show zero deaths from banding, zero deaths from sleeving. You could reasonable expect that over the last 5 years, they have banded 1,000 and let's say they have sleeved about the same number of people.

 

This would mean 0:1,000 deaths regardless of which procedure they perform. They have also had zero sleeve leaks. They have had something like 50 band complications such as leaks, slips, port flips, etc

 

In another thread I posted up comprehensive statistics from a MASSIVE research project undertaken in USA but looking at results internationally over 3(?) years. Basically the risk of death between a band and sleeve was roughly the same, slightly (and I mean marginally, by a poofteenth) higher for a bypass.

 

But I digress...if they are using statistics based on their State or their operating hospital, it really depends - there was one surgeon who seemed to have a bit of a 'bad run' earlier this year with a couple of sleeve leaks and one death. (I'm certain it was the same surgeon for all) but does that mean that he was/is a 'bad surgeon'? possibly...but having 'known' all his patients through another forum, these seemed to be caused mainly by other factors - one patient ate solid food about 3 days post op (lamb chop and steamed veges FFS!), another was a very heavy smoker and the impaired circulation caused by heavy smoking meant his sleeve staple line took much longer to heal and the death was due to a leak that went catastrophically wrong - the person had numerous other serious health issues and the admitting doctors at the hospital refused to believe that she had anything seriously wrong with her until it was too late.

 

In any case, when presented with ANY statistic, look at when the research was conducted, how large the sample size is, where it was conducted and who funded the research. You will be AMAZED at how checking and comparing the fine print of any research can really change your mind on what you are being told.

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I think there are pros and cons to all procedures and you will always find people who have wonderful success stories and those who have known or heard of horror stories too. Making your choice is not easy - but bear in mind that each person is different and that someone elses experience will not necessarily (obviously) be yours.

You might well have a great experience with either - or you might have every complication known to man.

All I can say is, maybe work out the best case scenario and then the worst case.... (you will probably be somewhere in the middle)... but  decide - if you were the worst case-( not death, but e.g. tube feeding forever) could you live with that? Is it worth that risk to you?

If not.. and it is not a risk that you are willing to take - then don't go for it!!

If it is worth the risk and it is something that would be a huge improvement to your life - then go ahead. Just make sure you are as informed as possible and willing to take the possible rough with the smooth.

All the best.

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I wonder where they get their stats from? the numbers really do depend on what sample they research and therefore actual statistics will vary widely.

 

For example, if my clinic used their own statistics, they would show zero deaths from banding, zero deaths from sleeving. You could reasonable expect that over the last 5 years, they have banded 1,000 and let's say they have sleeved about the same number of people.

 

This would mean 0:1,000 deaths regardless of which procedure they perform. They have also had zero sleeve leaks. They have had something like 50 band complications such as leaks, slips, port flips, etc

 

In another thread I posted up comprehensive statistics from a MASSIVE research project undertaken in USA but looking at results internationally over 3(?) years. Basically the risk of death between a band and sleeve was roughly the same, slightly (and I mean marginally, by a poofteenth) higher for a bypass.

 

But I digress...if they are using statistics based on their State or their operating hospital, it really depends - there was one surgeon who seemed to have a bit of a 'bad run' earlier this year with a couple of sleeve leaks and one death. (I'm certain it was the same surgeon for all) but does that mean that he was/is a 'bad surgeon'? possibly...but having 'known' all his patients through another forum, these seemed to be caused mainly by other factors - one patient ate solid food about 3 days post op (lamb chop and steamed veges FFS!), another was a very heavy smoker and the impaired circulation caused by heavy smoking meant his sleeve staple line took much longer to heal and the death was due to a leak that went catastrophically wrong - the person had numerous other serious health issues and the admitting doctors at the hospital refused to believe that she had anything seriously wrong with her until it was too late.

 

In any case, when presented with ANY statistic, look at when the research was conducted, how large the sample size is, where it was conducted and who funded the research. You will be AMAZED at how checking and comparing the fine print of any research can really change your mind on what you are being told.

I wonder where they get their stats from? the numbers really do depend on what sample they research and therefore actual statistics will vary widely.

 

For example, if my clinic used their own statistics, they would show zero deaths from banding, zero deaths from sleeving. You could reasonable expect that over the last 5 years, they have banded 1,000 and let's say they have sleeved about the same number of people.

 

This would mean 0:1,000 deaths regardless of which procedure they perform. They have also had zero sleeve leaks. They have had something like 50 band complications such as leaks, slips, port flips, etc

 

In another thread I posted up comprehensive statistics from a MASSIVE research project undertaken in USA but looking at results internationally over 3(?) years. Basically the risk of death between a band and sleeve was roughly the same, slightly (and I mean marginally, by a poofteenth) higher for a bypass.

 

But I digress...if they are using statistics based on their State or their operating hospital, it really depends - there was one surgeon who seemed to have a bit of a 'bad run' earlier this year with a couple of sleeve leaks and one death. (I'm certain it was the same surgeon for all) but does that mean that he was/is a 'bad surgeon'? possibly...but having 'known' all his patients through another forum, these seemed to be caused mainly by other factors - one patient ate solid food about 3 days post op (lamb chop and steamed veges FFS!), another was a very heavy smoker and the impaired circulation caused by heavy smoking meant his sleeve staple line took much longer to heal and the death was due to a leak that went catastrophically wrong - the person had numerous other serious health issues and the admitting doctors at the hospital refused to believe that she had anything seriously wrong with her until it was too late.

 

In any case, when presented with ANY statistic, look at when the research was conducted, how large the sample size is, where it was conducted and who funded the research. You will be AMAZED at how checking and comparing the fine print of any research can really change your mind on what you are being told.

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I think Kazbo and I could probably debate this till dawn and maybe that could be fun - just saying my Dr has been doing Bariatrics for maybe 14 years and he very happily promotes Sleeving as well but these are the stats he gave me - I will also say when I asked one of the other Consultants from his surgery about erosion because I went into the surgery with a list (Erosion, Slippage, Worst case scenario, vomiting, PB, what will I be eating) the Dr (not the surgeon) told me that she had seen cases in the public system but none since joining this clinic. My lovely friend that I mentioned earlier told me herself about the death of young woman from Mackay about 4 months ago which was due to leaking from a sleeve. We can't offer people on this forum stats from individual surgeons or clinics because people come here looking for information from all over Australia so we need to look at it more broader sense.

I am pro people deciding for themselves but we need to consider the big picture. I am so pleased for my gorgeous friend that everything has gone so well for her but she herself said today that she is happy that she is out of the danger type zone and that a leak from here on in has a very slight chance of happening.

Don't want to harp but some people coming to this forum may not be able to have access to my surgeon who I am sure has a much better stats relating to sleeving as well.

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Thanks for all the information, I have been a happy bandit for 4 years, lost over 100 kgs going from 206kgs too 99kgs and only in the past 6 months has some problem occurred with constant reflux and now having the band moved and caused a smaller pocket to form that this has become an issue and needs remedying......

 

After due consideration and looking at so much info on the internet, probably too much, I have decided to have the band removed and then have a sleeve gastrectomy completed...... I know all about statistics and it all boils down to the individual, their lifestyle and their commitment to doing something positive.

 

I will always give the band the greatest support as I experienced it and will hopefully be able to do the same after this next series of surgeries to remove the band and do the sleeve.....

 

Cheers,

Richard....

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Good choice and good luck with everything Richard

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Dear internet land

 

I'd bother to respond to Bridgey but I am sick to the back teeth of their bitchiness and ignorance...and their need to try and pick and bitch about my opinions. So tiring *yawn*...I can't be bothered with them anymore so I have decided to block/ignore them.

 

 

Richard - I wish you all the very, very best...hopefully your band can be removed soon so you can start the process of healing your body. I do hope you'll keep us all informed/updated of your progress and experiences!

 

I know I felt such a sense of grief and loss (and excitement) when I had mine out, I felt like I was being kicked out of a pretty special club of some amazeballs people!

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