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Band as bad as what they are making out these days?

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Hi all :)

I've been banded for nearly 2 years and pass my goal weight - booked in for tummy tuck in June and can not wait!! I am a practice nurse and have had Lap Surgery Australia attend two of my clinics lately and saying both times how Lapband is crap and how sleeve is so much better. Over 10 year periods lapband has been proven to be crap? Im really worried that the 6.5k I will be paying for the tummy tuck will be wasted if I go backwards? Im a terrible eater (still) - if I could be good I would not have lap band. 

One of the girls at my clinic as she was banded pre 2012 these lap Australia people gave her a FREE sleeve! Something to do with being pre 2012.

Im so worried that the band will wear off or will stop working?

Thoughts? 

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My lap and is still going strong after 10 years inside me and still working. I have some horrible habits that sometimes get out of control but what it boils down to is some days if I don't watch it, I eat nothing but biscuits and coffees - I can't do that AND eat healthy meals as I don't have roomSo that part is my choice and I am certainly capable of eating enough calories to gain weight but I have ALWAYS remained below a BMI of 25.

What I think is good about the band is it does loosen a bit over time and then you tighten it up s bit - people can and do stretch out sleeves over a period of years and weight regain from stretching out a bypass pouch is wel established fact. I have even been around enough forums for long enough to have seen quite a few people get banded AFTER bypass!

Of course the big downside of the band is the vomiting and getting stuck and some people just don't tolerate it well.

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if YOUR lap band is working fine for you and you don't have any problems, then why change?

 

Yep the lap band is no longer being hailed by many as the universal weightloss solution that it was. There are surgeons who refuse to install them these days. There seems to be many lap banders who are getting theirs removed and getting other WLS.

 

I'm an ex-bandit and now I am sleeved. I regret my lap band, I don't regret the sleeve and reckon that it is pretty darned good WLS for me and my situation. But that doesn't mean that it is the right solution for everyone, no more than the band was.

 

The sleeve is the current popular and highly recommended WLS solution - it's effective, it generally has a larger amount of weight lost, particularly in the first 12-18 months, ongoing maintenance by the surgeon is next to nil. Long term info is still being collected about long term weight loss.

 

Surgeons/clinics are realising that the lap band is an ongoing and expensive solution to have with constant follow ups and fills. Long term, there are many ongoing complications that may happen (slips, erosions, pouches, flipped ports, etc) so it isn't as cost effective for them or the patient than, say a sleeve, which requires very little (if any) ongoing maintenance.

 

My clinic has changed the way they do sleeves from even 3 years ago so techniques are also changing. Some surgeons do a triple stitch with a sort of plication (like mine does), some use a minimiser band, some use a very small bougie, some use larger ones.

 

Everyone is different and a consultation with a surgeon will enable someone to make an informed decision about what the best solution is for them.

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I am booked in to be banded May 6th. I found my surgeon seemed to prefer the sleeve. He didn't outright say that but he subtly suggested it I suppose. My dad was banded for roughly 5 years (I guess), and he had some problems and had have it removed and went with a sleeve. Even having problems he still said for him the band was much better for weight loss as with the sleeve he can still eat quite a bit more, as it has stretched out over time. I guess it's a personal choice. I have no problem with the permanence of the sleeve but I like the idea that I can adjust the band it if it's not working etc

Also I have been told that the lap band may need to be replaced down the track that it is not going to outlive me rather I it. I think she said about 10 years so it makes sense if it is said people are having issues at the 10 year mark. I guess time will tell.

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had no real issues with my band, not sure if I'm happy with the total weight loss, still working on that. Wanted a sleeve but as a public patient had no choice. banded almost 2 and a half years now. I would say most people change to sleeve due to issues with bands and as Ive had none really its hardly a reason to change. My sister is sleeved and has lost twice the amount of weight in less than half the time. She seems to be keeping it stable now which is great. However my weight very easily increases if I slip up.  I'm pretty much in the same position Ive always been in which is counting calories daily, smacking myself in the head all the time for slips up, the only thing is I'm doing it 20 plus kilo lighter now.  If the band plays up in the future and Im given the sleeve option i will take it. i cant see any reason not to and i doubt that it will be the be all end all either. I think my issues with food diet and health run way deeper than just weight loss surgery and i dont think WLS is the cure all but it certainly helps.  if your band is working well, stick to it.

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I've had my band for many years now and lost 85kg in 15 months with it. I think like everyone has stated that it's an individual choice. I had mine leak last year due to another surgeon perforating my tube by accident as he was not aware. In that time I considered to go the sleeve option but when I had the leak I resorted back to my over eating and I put 30kg back on. What it made me realise is that i needed my band cause I know that without that physical restriction that my band gives me I would over eat very easy and possibly stretch a sleeve. The band is a lot of work as there are things you can and can't eat that change on a daily basis. I'm fine with this and adjusted my eating habits accordingly. I love my band and would not consider a sleeve ever. Be happy with the choice you have made as that's what's best for you. There will always be someone who will convince you that their way is the best way but how do you know that's true, what happens if it's not. If you are happy with what choice you made then work with that. Good luck on your journey with your band

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"over eat very easy and possibly stretch a sleeve"... that right there from Princess would be my fear. Like most things, where there is a will, there is a way and I have no doubt I'd find the way. I'm coming up on my one year anniversary of the band and yes some days are tough, sure fills can be a pain in the ass and yes the weight loss is slower (in most cases) but for me, I've had my turn at getting everything quicker and easier. I needed this to be tougher, more of a struggle and sure, more costly. It seems my personality doesn't take things seriously enough until I am at absolute 3/4 over the edge. I know I need the restriction, the supervision and the accountability consistently and that's why the band is best for me.

Plus as it turns out, my Surgeon said it was physically my best option due to past medical issues, so this is a win win for me

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I spoke to my clinic about this very matter yesterday. As I was concerned about all the negativity surrounding the band on this forum and with random people (nurses) I have spoken to. My clinic is certainly not removing the band off their list in preference for the sleeve. In fact my doctor was saying that there are clinics out there that don't want to do the 'follow-up care' that's required with the band. Therefore, they prefer to preform the sleeve instead.

Mortality rate with the band during surgery is less then someone who has their gallbladder removed, where as the sleeve, there is higher chance of complications.

Statistically, the amount of excess weight you can expect to lose with the band is exactly the same as the sleeve.

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you can overeat with a band and stretch the pouch or even dilate the oesophagus

 

Some surgeons now install a "minimiser band" with a sleeve or a bypass - this device (which is not a lap band) apparently is the "hard hand brake" for overeating. It apparently doesn't have the problems that a lap band has. It seems to be a popular choice with surgeons and I have spoken to lots of people who have a minimiser band with their sleeve/bypass and they are happy with it.

 

Perhaps the "new wave" of WLS might be a more combined approach? taking the "best of both worlds" and combining into an even more effective solution?

 

The important thing to remember is this:

if someone is NOT having any issues with their WLS, they will tell you it's the best thing since sliced bread.

If someone is having issues with their WLS, they will tell you that it is 'bad' and to get something else.

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I'm getting the Minimizer Ring fitted when I get sleeved.

 

I currently work in a hospital and I was going through some patient records yesterday - my surgeon has removed several lapbands in the last few months, just at our hospital alone. I only see the theatre sheets, so it just says "removal of lap band" - it doesn't have full case details, so I'm not sure of the reasons (and I wouldn't read someone's file in such detail, anyway - my task yesterday required me to read the op description and doctor name, though).

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I've had my band for almost 15 years. I have a pouch but it's not bothering me and in fact at times I think it is a slight advantage since I can eat more normally when out at restaurants with others since more food can sit above my band waiting to go down. I asked my new surgeon at my last fill about whether I should switch to bypass or sleeve and he told me that I'm best to stay with a band because my main issue is sweet foods. Even if you get dumping at the start following bypass or sleeve you can gradually build your sweet food consumption up over time and dumping stops apparently. That's what he told me. So basically I need to work the band and stop dreaming about life being easier if I switched to another WLS. I have no problems with the band and can eat whatever I want in smaller quantities. I just need to avoid eating sugary crap and I will stay a normal size.

 

It seems like a very large number of people are switching WLS at the moment. I'm not really sure why everyone is changing from one to another though. Just makes me wonder whether everyone switching really have issues with the band or whether some think their life will be easier with a different WLS. While weight loss is faster with the sleeve or bypass I still wonder about how much weight people actually keep off over the long-term.

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I have rarely dumped with the sleeve, what I like about the sleeve is that where once upon a time, I was a sugar fiend and the sweeter the better, my tastes have changed and sweets/sugar no longer tastes nice.

 

Apparently it is not uncommon for this kind of change in taste to occur.

 

I still have the odd sweet thing but it no longer rocks my world...that said, cheese is my new thing.

 

I still have to be mindful of calories, etc, chips and crackers are easy to eat and can really up my caloric intake if I don't watch it.

 

Every kind if WLS has its pros and cons, like I said earlier....if you are happy with your lap band then don't worry about what anyone else thinks :D

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I've had my band for almost 15 years. I have a pouch but it's not bothering me and in fact at times I think it is a slight advantage since I can eat more normally when out at restaurants with others since more food can sit above my band waiting to go down. I asked my new surgeon at my last fill about whether I should switch to bypass or sleeve and he told me that I'm best to stay with a band because my main issue is sweet foods. Even if you get dumping at the start following bypass or sleeve you can gradually build your sweet food consumption up over time and dumping stops apparently. That's what he told me. So basically I need to work the band and stop dreaming about life being easier if I switched to another WLS. I have no problems with the band and can eat whatever I want in smaller quantities. I just need to avoid eating sugary crap and I will stay a normal size.

 

It seems like a very large number of people are switching WLS at the moment. I'm not really sure why everyone is changing from one to another though. Just makes me wonder whether everyone switching really have issues with the band or whether some think their life will be easier with a different WLS. While weight loss is faster with the sleeve or bypass I still wonder about how much weight people actually keep off over the long-term.

I just had a friend pm me about her band as she's had hers as long as I've had mine but she never went back after surgery to get fill in so it's never worked for her. Well now that she finally has fill and the restriction is starting she is freaking out cause there are foods she can now not eat. I told her this is common with thing with mine but I don't miss those foods which now do not go down and that this is the con of having a band. I said that the need to loose my weight, be healthy and live longer far out ways the need to eat steak or large meals. A week later her response to me was that all is good now as she's been back to see the surgeon and she's getting the band taken out and going the sleeve option. I personally think this is the lazy option for her to choose. It got me thinking though that maybe this is why there is such a high percentage of band removals to sleeve. Now I'm not saying that this is the case with all removals as sometimes the band works sometimes it doesn't in people but I do know from researching the sleeve that even though you still have to be careful with food, it's a lot easier than the band. Another friend of mine that I have know for years decided to go sleeve last year too as she said watching and listening to me made her realise the band is too much work, even though I don't find it hard at all. Everyone is different though and I in no way discourage anyone from the decision they choose to make for their own body

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I think the attraction of the band is that it is a relatively minor operation and does not require permanent alteration of your insides and therefore is a popular choice for surgeons and patients. The problem is that some 30 percent of patients experience problems and as we can see from our own forum some people do extremely well and others simply just dont for whatever reason. I dont think 3 years ago I would have contemplated any other alternative and honestly from what I had seen bypass was reserved for the morbidly obese (well based on what I had seen on telly anyway). I was extremely happy with my band and my results and probably lived with problems with it over the last year for longer than I should have as I was determined I would not have it removed as I called it my handbrake and the only thing that stood in the way of me regaining weight.

I do think doctors and patients should spend more time reviewing the options and motivation for WLS as it seems that quite often many people are less than prepared for the significant life changes that are required to make this work. People overeat for a multitude of reasons and you need to be in the right headspace to overcome this. I dont think any option is more value for money etc over the other and I am on a forum where many people seem to have gone through all the options e.g Band to sleeve to bypass..... This would lead me to assume that maybe a little more time should have been invested at the interim to ensure the right procedure was done in the first place.

All surgeries and options have their good points and bad points and risks, so I wouldnt be recommending any one over the other. I do know that the bypass is the most tried and tested for long term results and the procedure has be refined and simplified over the years. There is no magic bullet and all options can be undone by counter-productive behaviours and sliders - which sadly we are all capable of.

My recommendation would be having a very frank and detailed discussion with a surgeon, dietician and psychologist and be in a very motivated position of losing weight and exercising on your own before commencing with WLS. This will ensure and enhance your results afterwards. The goal is a healthly lifestyle and bodyweight at the end of it all and hopefully a way of maintaining this throughout lifes ups and downs :). For me this was about the longterm keeping it off, not just a losing it strategy. I have lost weight enough times to know the hard part was maintaining the loss not the losing it part. So band, sleeve or bypass if you are getting to where you need to be be and are happy and healthy, there are no right or wrongs. Happy tuesday

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I just had a friend pm me about her band as she's had hers as long as I've had mine but she never went back after surgery to get fill in so it's never worked for her. Well now that she finally has fill and the restriction is starting she is freaking out cause there are foods she can now not eat. I told her this is common with thing with mine but I don't miss those foods which now do not go down and that this is the con of having a band. I said that the need to loose my weight, be healthy and live longer far out ways the need to eat steak or large meals. A week later her response to me was that all is good now as she's been back to see the surgeon and she's getting the band taken out and going the sleeve option. I personally think this is the lazy option for her to choose. It got me thinking though that maybe this is why there is such a high percentage of band removals to sleeve. Now I'm not saying that this is the case with all removals as sometimes the band works sometimes it doesn't in people but I do know from researching the sleeve that even though you still have to be careful with food, it's a lot easier than the band. Another friend of mine that I have know for years decided to go sleeve last year too as she said watching and listening to me made her realise the band is too much work, even though I don't find it hard at all. Everyone is different though and I in no way discourage anyone from the decision they choose to make for their own body

I agree, it does seem like the sleeve (and bypass) is much easier than the band which is why people loose so much weight fast compared to bandsters. What I'm not clear about is, even though it is easier initially to drop the weight whether that then slowly changes in the years that follow since most sleevers bounce back upwards by around the 2 year mark. Then I'd be back to where I currently am which is that in order to loose weight and keep it off you still have to work at it and make sure you are not consuming excessive calories or you will regain weight. This is why I'm not rushing to convert to another WLS and even though I have a pouch I don't have any issues with the band and can eat any foods in small amounts.

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I think the attraction of the band is that it is a relatively minor operation and does not require permanent alteration of your insides and therefore is a popular choice for surgeons and patients. The problem is that some 30 percent of patients experience problems and as we can see from our own forum some people do extremely well and others simply just dont for whatever reason. I dont think 3 years ago I would have contemplated any other alternative and honestly from what I had seen bypass was reserved for the morbidly obese (well based on what I had seen on telly anyway). I was extremely happy with my band and my results and probably lived with problems with it over the last year for longer than I should have as I was determined I would not have it removed as I called it my handbrake and the only thing that stood in the way of me regaining weight.

I do think doctors and patients should spend more time reviewing the options and motivation for WLS as it seems that quite often many people are less than prepared for the significant life changes that are required to make this work. People overeat for a multitude of reasons and you need to be in the right headspace to overcome this. I dont think any option is more value for money etc over the other and I am on a forum where many people seem to have gone through all the options e.g Band to sleeve to bypass..... This would lead me to assume that maybe a little more time should have been invested at the interim to ensure the right procedure was done in the first place.

All surgeries and options have their good points and bad points and risks, so I wouldnt be recommending any one over the other. I do know that the bypass is the most tried and tested for long term results and the procedure has be refined and simplified over the years. There is no magic bullet and all options can be undone by counter-productive behaviours and sliders - which sadly we are all capable of.

My recommendation would be having a very frank and detailed discussion with a surgeon, dietician and psychologist and be in a very motivated position of losing weight and exercising on your own before commencing with WLS. This will ensure and enhance your results afterwards. The goal is a healthly lifestyle and bodyweight at the end of it all and hopefully a way of maintaining this throughout lifes ups and downs :). For me this was about the longterm keeping it off, not just a losing it strategy. I have lost weight enough times to know the hard part was maintaining the loss not the losing it part. So band, sleeve or bypass if you are getting to where you need to be be and are happy and healthy, there are no right or wrongs. Happy tuesday

I think people dont realise there are also conversions from sleeve or by-pass to band. As the sleeve is relatively new in Australia, it makes me wonder if in another 5-10 years we will start seeing people fail at the sleeve and get a band put over the top. Or perhaps there will be another WLS popular then. 15 years ago when I was banded there was only band or by-pass and as I was only 24 there was no way I was going to have a by-pass as I thought it was too drastic for me at that point in time.

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I think the attraction of the band is that it is a relatively minor operation and does not require permanent alteration of your insides and therefore is a popular choice for surgeons and patients. The problem is that some 30 percent of patients experience problems and as we can see from our own forum some people do extremely well and others simply just dont for whatever reason. 

I do think doctors and patients should spend more time reviewing the options and motivation for WLS as it seems that quite often many people are less than prepared for the significant life changes that are required to make this work. People overeat for a multitude of reasons and you need to be in the right headspace to overcome this.

My recommendation would be having a very frank and detailed discussion with a surgeon, dietician and psychologist and be in a very motivated position of losing weight and exercising on your own before commencing with WLS. This will ensure and enhance your results afterwards. The goal is a healthly lifestyle and bodyweight at the end of it all and hopefully a way of maintaining this throughout lifes ups and downs :)

 

Sorry for chopping up your post Sara, but I found these points really valid in regards to this topic. Albeit my personal experience is just a year, I have read alot, both medical and other peoples experiences and like Sara said, just based on the readings here in our own forum, some do extremely well with the band some others simply just don't for "whatever reason". 

 

I know in other threads the topic of compulsory Psychologist appts have been discussed, as so much of WLS is the head game post surgery. I wonder if patients were better mentally prepared (both prior and post procedure) choices would be better for type of WLS and post op decisions would also be more manageable. I don't believe anyone here would doubt the psychological angle WLS plays in our lives each day, so to make it a compulsory component prior to surgery does seem like a natural way to go to perhaps curb some of the "swapping" from one WLS to another for better/quicker results.

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you can overeat with a band and stretch the pouch or even dilate the oesophagus

 

Some surgeons now install a "minimiser band" with a sleeve or a bypass - this device (which is not a lap band) apparently is the "hard hand brake" for overeating. It apparently doesn't have the problems that a lap band has. It seems to be a popular choice with surgeons and I have spoken to lots of people who have a minimiser band with their sleeve/bypass and they are happy with it.

 

Perhaps the "new wave" of WLS might be a more combined approach? taking the "best of both worlds" and combining into an even more effective solution?

 

The important thing to remember is this:

if someone is NOT having any issues with their WLS, they will tell you it's the best thing since sliced bread.

If someone is having issues with their WLS, they will tell you that it is 'bad' and to get something else.

 

 

Ive never heard of this minimiser band!  what I dont get is that if having the sleeve is so much easier, (people I know seem to have lost their weight much easier with sleeve)  why would you need it. I was under the impression having the sleeve meant restriction like a band but without the issues of blockage or fills?   I wish i could get myself more motivated at the moment, I am having some serious issues with my joints and have not been able to exercise and for me exercise does play a huge part in my success with losing weight. At the moment I'm having serious issues even being able to walk around a shopping centre let alone do the sort of exercise i was doing when i was first banded.  That said the band is working, I know all about it if I overeat. . 

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The CBS people have 20 years of follow-up experience with WLS. The sleeve is relatively newer, ALTHOUGH the sleeve proponents will say that there is a long history of sleeve gastrectomies for other reasons (namely peptic ulcer disease) that well pre-dates its use in WLS, and they say there is little risk of diminution over time. However, the weight loss effect in these people sleeved for non-weight loss reasons biases that assumption: yes, there have been sleeve gastrectomies for as long as there has been effective anaesthetics (so, coming up on 100 years) but the follow-up for gastrectomies for weight loss is well in its infancy.

 

As others have said: if it is working for you, then don't worry about it. These people are there to spruik a product, and as someone who works in a doctor's surgery they will actually TARGET you to try and change the clinic's practice and referral preferences: this is why drug companies are so angry at the crackdown on their advertising practices to medical practitioners: if it hadn't worked in the past to change doctor's prescribing practices why would it bother them so much to change the rules (see Dr David Henry's writing on this). As was said above, a sleeve has less follow-up for the practitioner or practice who performs it, so the cost benefit per procedure is much higher.

 

The evidence is not conclusive on either method at the moment, BUT if the band works for you, don't put yourself through unnecessary surgery and anaesthetic risk!

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Ive never heard of this minimiser band!  what I dont get is that if having the sleeve is so much easier, (people I know seem to have lost their weight much easier with sleeve)  why would you need it. I was under the impression having the sleeve meant restriction like a band but without the issues of blockage or fills?   

 

It's basically just a cable tie that goes around the stomach to stop it stretching back out - it doesn't do anything a gastric band does. It can't be filled, and it doesn't create a pouch.

 

I'll be getting one when I have my sleeve done.

 

GastricRing_Slider.png

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that's funny as AB ... love it!   bet its way cheaper too!  lol

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that's funny as AB ... love it!   bet its way cheaper too!  lol

 

and Bunnings do run DIY classes.... ha! 

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and Bunnings do run DIY classes.... ha! 

 

I bet you could get most of the stuff you need for the op from there - staple gun, Stanley knives, superglue, pipe cameras... big hammer to knock you out...

 

I've watched enough videos of the procedure that I could probably have a fair whack at it!

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