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Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base

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Abstract

The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science. The seriousness of diabetes requires that we evaluate all of the evidence that is available. The 12 points are sufficiently compelling that we feel that the burden of proof rests with those who are opposed.

http://www.nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007%2814%2900332-3/fulltext

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I'm a testament to that. Days of carb loaded foods would result in lethargy, high blood sugar, tiredness and "slow" thinking. I'd often nap, which would disrupt my evening sleep, wake up feeling like I was hit by a truck and of course, because I just slept after heavy carb loading, my blood sugar was still high. It is a cycle. My brain would tell me I needed carbs to feel "full" so I would load up. Things as simple as bread is now out of my diet and it was that change alone that I noticed to be the biggest change to my diabetes. 6 months post band I had toast one day and watched my sugars go to over a 10. A reading I hadn't had since prior to surgery.

 

Now 14 months later, barely having carbs in my daily intake and of course losing nearly 40 kilos, my type 2 has been reversed and all medication has ceased. The most noticeable thing you do not realise while living it, but you sure do afterwards, is how much better you feel when the heavy carbs are gone. I feel lighter, less "foggy" with my thinking, I am faster to respond to things (cognitive skills) and I now have energy so I want to do things instead of sleep.

 

This article is me.

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I'm a testament to that. Days of carb loaded foods would result in lethargy, high blood sugar, tiredness and "slow" thinking. I'd often nap, which would disrupt my evening sleep, wake up feeling like I was hit by a truck and of course, because I just slept after heavy carb loading, my blood sugar was still high. It is a cycle. My brain would tell me I needed carbs to feel "full" so I would load up.

 

 The most noticeable thing you do not realise while living it, but you sure do afterwards, is how much better you feel when the heavy carbs are gone. I feel lighter, less "foggy" with my thinking, I am faster to respond to things (cognitive skills) and I now have energy so I want to do things instead of sleep.

 

This article is me.

 

Me too Angel Butterfly!

 

Although I was never diagnosed with insulin resistance - simply because I had never had had the tests (!) when I went low carb in 2002 I noticed a significant difference in 'brain fog' and feeling sluggish. Huge improvement.  I had previously put these down to the ME/CFS.

Also Nov/Dec last year when I had a big carb blow out (and also week 7 post sleeve) same same - increased sluggishness, brain fog, increased reduced cognitive function general unwell-er etc etc.

Now I am ultra low carb, my cognitive function is as good as it gets with having ME/CFS + Fibromyalgia (I still have shocking short term memory).

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